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Edit: I resolved this by changing the position of .firstlayer to absolute. This makes the setting left/right margins to auto not work to center the container, so I set left:0; and right:0; which, when I define a width and mark it as important, centered the container. Thank you all for your help!

To clarify, I'm trying to get the to extend to the bottom of the page. All my attempts so far have been unsuccessful. Also, all of the height attributes are in .firstlayer for browser compatibility.

Annotated screenshots can be found here: (I'm just doing layout now, so it looks silly). Top looks fine Bottom doesn't

I have a pretty silly question. I'm working on a webpage, and I'm trying to get a <span> area to extend all the way to the bottom of the page. I've searched online for answers, and I've made sure Iset the body and html height to 100% and the container height to auto/min-height to 100%, but it's still only reaching to the page break.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to fix this?

My CSS is here:

html, body, div, span, applet, object, iframe, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, p, blockquote, pre, a, abbr, acronym, address, big, cite, code, del, dfn, em, img, ins, kbd, q, s, samp, small, strike, strong, sub, sup, tt, var, b, u, i, center, dl, dt, dd, ol, ul, li, fieldset, form, label, legend, table, caption, tbody, tfoot, thead, tr, th, td, article, aside, canvas, details, embed, figure, figcaption, footer, header, hgroup, menu, nav, output, ruby, section, summary, time, mark, audio, video{
    border:0 none;
    font:inherit;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    }

html, body { width:100%; height:100%; }

body { background: #ff8 url("blue.jpg") repeat fixed; font-family: Helvetica, San-Serif; }



    /*----- GRID -----*/
.container {
    background: none;
    overflow: none;
    display: block;
    z-index: 1;
    } 

.firstlayer { 
    background-color: #fff !important;
    height: auto !important; 
    min-height: 100%; 
    height: 100%;
    width: 960px; 
    margin:0 auto;
    border-left: solid 1px #000;  border-right: solid 1px #000;
    }

.padded  {margin-left:20px; margin-right:20px;}

span { height:auto; }
    .onecol { width:8.33%; float:left; }
    .twocols { width:16.66%;  float:left; }
    .threecols { width:25%;  float:left; }
    .fourcols { width:33.33%;  float:left; }
    .fivecols { width:41.66%;  float:left; }
    .sixcols { width:50%;  float:left; }
    .sevencols { width:58.33%;  float:left; }
    .eightcols { width:66.66%;  float:left; }
    .ninecols { width:75%; float:left;  }
    .tencols { width:83.33%;  float:left; }
    .elevencols { width:91.66%;  float:left; }
    .allcols { width:100%;  float:left; }

footer {
    font-size: 0.75em;
    color: #fff;
    background: 100px #000;
    padding:10px 20px 10px 20px;
    bottom: 0px; 
    height:7em;  
    }

And my HTML code is here:

    <!--Begin the content area-->

    <span class="container firstlayer">
        <span class="container  padded">

<!--TITLE AND SUBTITLE-->
            <span class="container allcols">
                <h1>Stand-in Title</h1>
                <h1 class="subtitle">Stand-in Subtitle</h1>
            </span>

<!--MEDIA PLACEHOLDER-->
            <span style="height:400px; background-color:#000;" class="container allcols">
            </span>

<!--ROW ZERO: 2 COLS-->
            <span class="allcols" style="padding-top:1em;"> 
                <span class="container sixcols">
                    <h2>Subtitle</h2>
                    <p> Lorem ipsum </p>
                </span>
                <span class="container sixcols">
                    <h2>Subtitle</h2>
                    <p> Lorem ipsum </p>
                </span>
            </span>  

        </span>
    </span> 
share|improve this question
    
Try removing the span { height:auto; } line –  Hope4You Jun 14 '12 at 23:40
    
If i understand correctly your trying to have the media container expand it's height based on the window size right? –  Keith Jun 14 '12 at 23:41
    
You should be using div's in place of span's. div's are suitable wrapper containers since they are "block" level elements. span's are not suitable wrapper containers since they are "inline" elements. See the W3 spec. –  Sparky Jun 15 '12 at 16:01

3 Answers 3

Here ya go. Try not to use <span> tag but change it to a <div> tag. They are more robust and for no reason they do not work sometimes... Also you had too many height variables set as well. Basically when you had: height: auto !important; min-height: 100%; height: 100%; They were all contradicting each other. Simpler is normally better you were overthinking it a bit :)

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>

<style type="text/css">
html, body, div, div, applet, object, iframe, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, p, blockquote, pre, a, abbr, acronym, address, big, cite, code, del, dfn, em, img, ins, kbd, q, s, samp, small, strike, strong, sub, sup, tt, var, b, u, i, center, dl, dt, dd, ol, ul, li, fieldset, form, label, legend, table, caption, tbody, tfoot, thead, tr, th, td, article, aside, canvas, details, embed, figure, figcaption, footer, header, hgroup, menu, nav, output, ruby, section, summary, time, mark, audio, video{
    border:0 none;
    font:inherit;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    }

html, body { width:100%; height:100%; }

body { background: #ff8 url("blue.jpg") repeat fixed; font-family: Helvetica, San-Serif; }

    ...

    /*----- GRID -----*/
.container {
    background: none;
    overflow: none;
    display: block;
    z-index: 1;
    } 

.firstlayer { 
    background-color: #fff !important;
    min-height: 100%;
    max-height:100%;
    width: 960px; 
    margin:0 auto;
    border-left: solid 1px #000;  border-right: solid 1px #000;
    }

.padded  {margin-left:20px; margin-right:20px;}

div { height:auto; }
    .onecol { width:8.33%; float:left; }
    .twocols { width:16.66%;  float:left; }
    .threecols { width:25%;  float:left; }
    .fourcols { width:33.33%;  float:left; }
    .fivecols { width:41.66%;  float:left; }
    .sixcols { width:50%;  float:left; }
    .sevencols { width:58.33%;  float:left; }
    .eightcols { width:66.66%;  float:left; }
    .ninecols { width:75%; float:left;  }
    .tencols { width:83.33%;  float:left; }
    .elevencols { width:91.66%;  float:left; }
    .allcols { width:100%;  float:left; }

footer {
    font-size: 0.75em;
    color: #fff;
    background: 100px #000;
    padding:10px 20px 10px 20px;
    bottom: 0px; 
    height:7em;  
    }
</style>

</head>

<body>


 <div class="container firstlayer">
        <div class="container  padded">

<!--TITLE AND SUBTITLE-->
            <div class="container allcols">
                <h1>Stand-in Title</h1>
                <h1 class="subtitle">Stand-in Subtitle</h1>
            </div>

<!--MEDIA PLACEHOLDER-->
            <div style="height:400px; background-color:#000;" class="container allcols">
            </div>

<!--ROW ZERO: 2 COLS-->
            <div class="allcols" style="padding-top:1em;"> 
                <div class="container sixcols">
                    <h2>Subtitle</h2>
                    <p> Lorem ipsum </p>
                </div>
                <div class="container sixcols">
                    <h2>Subtitle</h2>
                    <p> Lorem ipsum </p>
                </div>
            </div>  
        ... 
        </div>
    </div> 
</body>
</html>

Hope this helps!!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the try, but this isn't working for me either. I didn't understand your sentence about "try to use tag but change it to a tag" though, so I didn't try that - could you clarify that? I set the height that way in order to account for different browsers - modern browsers would take the first one marked important, while older browsers (cough IE6) ignore important and don't understand min-height. That way--theoretically, at least, and it's worked for me in the past--it's compatible with almost everything. –  Lee Jun 15 '12 at 0:17
    
@Lee there were unescaped tags in that sentence that didn't show up - fixed. –  Hans Kesting Jun 15 '12 at 13:14

I noticed that you have a couple of span classes set to float:left. I'm assuming that you have taken Epik's advice to change those to divs instead.

Not entirely sure if you have included any clearfixes to your HTML as the code sample you provided is partial and considering that your screenshots are indicating that the main container or wrapper isn't even regarding the existence of the floated child elements to contain them, it might likely be that there aren't any clearfixes. You might want resolve that issue first by adding a clearfix after the floated elements before you go on to try and get the div in question to fill the screen. Something like this:

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="col1" class="col">1</div>
    <div id="col2" class="col">2</div>
    <div id="col3" class="col">3</div>
<div class="clearfix"></div>
</div>

CSS

body{
    background:#333333;
}

#container{
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    position:absolute;
    background:#ffffff;
    top:0;
    left:0;
}

.col{
    float:left;
    width:30%;
    margin-right:30px;
    background:#cccccc;
    color:#333333;
}

.clearfix:before, .clearfix:after { 
    content: ""; 
    display: table; 
}

.clearfix:after { 
    clear: both; 
}

.clearfix { 
    zoom: 1; 
}

You will notice in the above that I added position:absolute to #container. This is because if you do not do so, the height:100% definition will not work. The clearfix in this case may not seem like it is necessary since the container will always fill the entire height of the window. However, if your content is dynamic in the sense that you will keep adding more columns to the container, the container will likely fail to register the new floated columns and you'd be ending up in square one again.

So basically, what's being done here is that you first need to add a clearfix to make the container recognize the presence of floated child elements and then position the container as absolute first before using height:100% or something lesser like height:90% to free up essential space for your black footer.

I've put the sample codes in jsFiddle for your reference - http://jsfiddle.net/qmHzC/

You'd notice that I've set the body to background:#333333. This is to act as a control for you to test the code. Remove position:absolute from #container and you'd see that the container no longer takes up the entire window and will reveal the body's darker background. On top of removing the absolute positioning, you can also try removing the <div class="clearfix"></div> after the floated child elements and you'd see that the white container no longer recognizes the floated child elements and immediately disappears like as if it is holding nothing.

Hope this helps!

EDIT: After some thought, I strongly feel that the issue is more because of the lack of a clearfix. Positioning the container as absolute will prevent you from using margin:0 auto to centralise the container in the center of the viewport. Moreover, the container is only supposed to flow right down to the top of the black footer rather than the bottom of the window. As such, the true height of the white container should only go as much as it's content's worth plus any top or bottom paddings. To achieve that, the clearfix solution should work on it's own. I'm not gonna edit off the position:absolute portion as it might be helpful for those who are thinking of making a div inherit the window's height and width without the use of jQuery.

share|improve this answer

I really wouldn't worry too much about IE6 as most people/companies these days are moving away from supporting this. The company i work for have already because it is just too old (pre Windows XP, 2001).

Instead of using span tags use div tags because if u would like to add in HTML5 later it is alot more diverse then a span tag.

Basically it works for me setting max and min height with removing height:auto and height:100%.

Let me know how you go and if it keeps up please post a screenshot of what you are getting so i can compare and test.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that, and it doesn't seem to have an effect. I also took out all of the extra height constraints, but that didn't do anything either. I'll try to put up some screenshots in a minute. –  Lee Jun 15 '12 at 0:52
    
Okay, screenshots are up. –  Lee Jun 15 '12 at 1:06
    
-1 for your weak answer and use of texting shorthand. –  Sparky Jun 15 '12 at 16:03

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