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I wonder whether someone has an idea for how to count combinations like the following in a better way than I've thought of.

> library(lubridate)
> df <- data.frame(x=sample(now()+hours(1:3), 100, T), y=sample(1:4, 100, T))
> with(df, as.data.frame(table(x, y)))
                     x y Freq
1  2012-06-15 00:10:18 1    5
2  2012-06-15 01:10:18 1    9
3  2012-06-15 02:10:18 1    8
4  2012-06-15 00:10:18 2    9
5  2012-06-15 01:10:18 2   10
6  2012-06-15 02:10:18 2   12
7  2012-06-15 00:10:18 3    7
8  2012-06-15 01:10:18 3    9
9  2012-06-15 02:10:18 3    6
10 2012-06-15 00:10:18 4    5
11 2012-06-15 01:10:18 4   14
12 2012-06-15 02:10:18 4    6

I like that format, but unfortunately when we ran x and y through table(), they got converted to factors. In the final output they can exist quite nicely as their original type, but getting there seems problematic. Currently I just manually fix all the types afterward, which is really messy because I have to re-set the timezone, and look up the percent-codes for the default date format, etc. etc.

It seems like an efficient solution would involve hashing the objects, or otherwise mapping integers to the unique values of x and y so we can use tabulate(), then mapping back.

Ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's data.table version that preserves the column classes:

library(data.table)

dt <- data.table(df, key=c("x", "y"))
dt[, .N, by=key(dt)]
#                       x y  N
#  1: 2012-06-14 18:10:22 1  8
#  2: 2012-06-14 18:10:22 2 10
#  3: 2012-06-14 18:10:22 3  8
#  4: 2012-06-14 18:10:22 4  8
#  5: 2012-06-14 19:10:22 1  6
#  6: 2012-06-14 19:10:22 2  8
#  7: 2012-06-14 19:10:22 3  6
#  8: 2012-06-14 19:10:22 4  6
#  9: 2012-06-14 20:10:22 1 15
# 10: 2012-06-14 20:10:22 2  5
# 11: 2012-06-14 20:10:22 3 12
# 12: 2012-06-14 20:10:22 4  8

str(dt[, .N, by=key(dt)])
# Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame':  12 obs. of  3 variables:
#  $ x: POSIXct, format: "2012-06-14 18:10:22" "2012-06-14 18:10:22" ...
#  $ y: int  1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 ...
#  $ N: int  8 10 8 8 6 8 6 6 15 5 ...

Edit in response to follow-up question

To count the number of appearances of all possible combinations of the observed factor levels (including those which don't appear in the data), you can do something like the following:

dt<-dt[1:30,]  # Make subset of dt in which some factor combinations don't appear

ii <- do.call("CJ", lapply(dt, unique))  # CJ() is similar to expand.grid()
dt[ii, .N]
#                      x y N
# 1: 2012-06-14 22:53:05 1 8
# 2: 2012-06-14 22:53:05 2 7
# 3: 2012-06-14 22:53:05 3 9
# 4: 2012-06-14 22:53:05 4 5
# 5: 2012-06-14 23:53:05 1 1
# 6: 2012-06-14 23:53:05 2 0
# 7: 2012-06-14 23:53:05 3 0
# 8: 2012-06-14 23:53:05 4 0
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Very nice. I keep almost switching wholesale to data.table but never really making the leap. Maybe I should. –  Ken Williams Jun 15 '12 at 0:29
    
Actually - when I run that code using 3 keys x,y,z instead of just two, it complains about object '.N' not found. In my real data I have 3 keys, but I'd boiled it down to 2 for this question, thinking that wasn't important. Is there something about .N that makes it unavailable with 3 keys? –  Ken Williams Jun 15 '12 at 0:33
    
Oops - my bad, it works fine. I copied a variable name wrong. –  Ken Williams Jun 15 '12 at 0:43
    
@KenWilliams -- Me too. Now that Matthew Dowle has implemented := with by, it's more tempting than ever. I feel like that's a killer feature that'll really increase data.table's appeal, as it allows such a natural and compact syntax for split-apply-combine summaries. –  Josh O'Brien Jun 15 '12 at 0:47
    
Is there a way to get it to keep all combinations of the keys like table() does, and like you can get with ddply(.drop=FALSE)? I do want zeroes there for combinations that don't occur in the data, but I'm not seeing in the docs how to accomplish that. –  Ken Williams Jun 15 '12 at 0:48

You can use ddply

library(plyr)

ddply(df, .(x, y), summarize, Freq = length(y))

If you want it arranged by y then x

ddply(df, .(y, x), summarize, Freq = length(y))

or if column ordering is important as well as row ordering

arrange(ddply(df, .(x, y), summarize, Freq = length(y)), y)
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have mentioned that ddply() was actually the first way I wrote this. Unfortunately it's WAY slower than the table() method. Which makes sense - table() just tabulate counts, whereas ddply() has to actually extract all the related data and feed it to the function. –  Ken Williams Jun 15 '12 at 0:25
    
I did not realize efficiency was the aim. data.table is definitely the way to go. I am currently converting myself from plyr to data.table. –  mnel Jun 15 '12 at 0:53
    
Yes, I should have been more clear in my question. I'm glad to see this solution with summarize though, I didn't know about that function. FWIW, it also works with ddply(df, .(x, y), nrow) but the column name isn't quite as nice. –  Ken Williams Jun 15 '12 at 14:05

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