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I'm learning about C++11 concurrency, where my only prior experience with concurrency primitives was in Operating Systems class six years ago, so be gentle, if you can.

In C++11, we can write

std::mutex m;
std::condition_variable cv;
std::queue<int> q;

void producer_thread() {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(m);
    q.push(42);
    cv.notify_one();
}

void consumer_thread() {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(m);
    while (q.empty()) {
        cv.wait(lock);
    }
    q.pop();
}

This works fine, but I'm offended by the need to wrap cv.wait in a loop. The reason we need the loop is clear to me:

Consumer (inside wait())       Producer            Vulture

release the lock
sleep until notified
                               acquire the lock
                               I MADE YOU A COOKIE
                               notify Consumer
                               release the lock
                                                   acquire the lock
                                                   NOM NOM NOM
                                                   release the lock
acquire the lock
return from wait()
HEY WHERE'S MY COOKIE                              I EATED IT

Now, I believe one of the cool things about unique_lock is that we can pass it around, right? So it would be really elegant if we could do this instead:

Consumer (inside wait())       Producer

release the lock
sleep until notified
                               acquire the lock
                               I MADE YOU A COOKIE
                               notify and yield(passing the lock)
wake(receiving the lock)
return from wait()
YUM
release the lock

Now there's no way for the Vulture thread to swoop in, because the mutex remains locked all the way from I MADE YOU A COOKIE to YUM. Plus, if notify() requires that you pass a lock, that's a good way to ensure that people actually lock the mutex before calling notify() (see Signalling a condition variable (pthreads)).

I'm pretty sure that C++11 doesn't have any standard implementation of this idiom. What's the historical reason for that (is it just that pthreads didn't do it? and then why is that)? Is there a technical reason that an adventurous C++ coder couldn't implement this idiom in standard C++11, calling it perhaps my_better_condition_variable?

I also have a vague feeling that maybe I'm reinventing semaphores, but I don't remember enough from school to know if that's accurate or not.

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3  
Erm, if you don't want some thread to eat the cookie, why are you even running it? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 15 '12 at 0:11
2  
Good point, the tone of my question was a bit biased against Vultures. :) See, Consumer is having a nice dream. He's willing to be woken up for cookies and milk, but if he wakes up and finds no cookies, he's going to be upset. So it's okay for Producer to feed cookies to Vulture, but it's not okay for Producer to wake up Consumer by shaking him and yelling "COOKIE TIME!" and then going "oh, whoops, Vulture eated your cookie while I was shaking you." That's not cool, Producer. That's not cool. –  Quuxplusone Jun 15 '12 at 0:24
    
That makes no sense. You can't expect multiple unrelated threads that are unaware of the other threads accessing the same shared data to work correctly. How would Vulture ever eat any cookies with your proposed solution? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 15 '12 at 0:25
    
Oh come on. Slow down and read. (Is there an instant-message-type thing we could take this to, to avoid cluttering these comments?) Vulture can eat as many cookies as he likes, by waiting on the same condition variable as Consumer. In fact, the situation is perfectly symmetric; perhaps Vulture would prefer not to be woken up just to find out that Consumer had eaten his cookie. –  Quuxplusone Jun 15 '12 at 0:28
1  
+1 For lovely story about vultures :). –  Red XIII Feb 24 '13 at 19:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The ultimate answer is because pthreads didn't do it. C++ is a language that encapsulates operating system functionality. C++ is not an operating system or platform. And so it encapsulates the existing functionality of operating systems such as linux, unix and windows.

However pthreads also has a good rationale for this behavior as well. From the Open Group Base Specifications:

The effect is that more than one thread can return from its call to pthread_cond_wait() or pthread_cond_timedwait() as a result of one call to pthread_cond_signal(). This effect is called "spurious wakeup". Note that the situation is self-correcting in that the number of threads that are so awakened is finite; for example, the next thread to call pthread_cond_wait() after the sequence of events above blocks.

While this problem could be resolved, the loss of efficiency for a fringe condition that occurs only rarely is unacceptable, especially given that one has to check the predicate associated with a condition variable anyway. Correcting this problem would unnecessarily reduce the degree of concurrency in this basic building block for all higher-level synchronization operations.

An added benefit of allowing spurious wakeups is that applications are forced to code a predicate-testing-loop around the condition wait. This also makes the application tolerate superfluous condition broadcasts or signals on the same condition variable that may be coded in some other part of the application. The resulting applications are thus more robust. Therefore, IEEE Std 1003.1-2001 explicitly documents that spurious wakeups may occur.

So basically the claim is that you can build my_better_condition_variable on top of a pthreads condition variable (or std::condition_variable) fairly easily and without performance penalty. However if we put my_better_condition_variable at the base level, then those clients who did not need the functionality of my_better_condition_variable would have to pay for it anyway.

This philosophy of putting the fastest, most primitive design at the bottom of the stack, with the intent that better/slower things can be built on top of them, runs throughout the C++ lib. And where the C++ lib fails to follow this philosophy, clients are often (and rightly) irritated.

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R. Martinho Fernandes and I had a nice long discussion in chat, so I don't have many more unanswered questions. pthreads made the decision that you can't lock a mutex in one thread and unlock it in another; therefore it's impossible to pass a lock on a pthreads mutex from Producer to Consumer in my example (and std::mutex is modeled on pthreads). Building my_better_condition_variable would therefore require more work than I thought, because you'd first have to build my_unsafer_mutex. It'd be a whole threads library parallel to and incompatible with the C++11 library. –  Quuxplusone Jun 15 '12 at 1:27
1  
"So basically the claim is that you can build ... fairly easily and without performance penalty." And then "However if we put ... would have to pay for it anyway." If there's no performance penalty, then what are they paying for exactly? –  ildjarn Jun 15 '12 at 2:16
    
@ildjarn: As explained in the posix rationale, the need for the loop around the wait is that the wait can return spuriously (i.e. without being signaled). The claim is that it is far less expensive to implement a condition variable that can return spuriously from a wait, as opposed to one that doesn't. And most clients of condition variable will ignore spurious wake ups anyway. So those clients should not have to pay for a condition variable that is guaranteed to not return spuriously. –  Howard Hinnant Jun 15 '12 at 20:53
    
@Howard : It's the phrase "without performance penalty" that is confusing. –  ildjarn Jun 15 '12 at 20:54

If you don't want to write the loop you can use the overload that takes the predicate instead:

cv.wait(lock, [&q]{ return !q.is_empty(); });

It is defined to be equivalent to the loop, so it works just as the original code.

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(For the record.) My objection to this solution was that it still has a polling loop, hidden inside the implementation of wait. If my code is going to loop, I'd actually prefer the explicit while loop. –  Quuxplusone Jun 15 '12 at 1:30
1  
@Quuxplusone : "Equivalent to" is very far removed from "implemented in terms of" in the C++ standard. "Equivalent to" explains the expected semantics/outcome, but that doesn't imply that there's a literal polling loop here in any way. –  ildjarn Jun 15 '12 at 2:09

Even if you could do this, the C++11 spec allows cv.wait() to unblock spuriously (to account for platforms that have that behavior). So even if there are no vulture threads (setting aside the argument about whether or not they should exist), the consumer thread can't expect there to be a cookie waiting, and still has to check.

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