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I'm sure this is easy, but so help me I can't figure out why I can't return the right result.

Pretty standard setup, I have a ref_product table, a ref_tagmap table and a ref_tag table...

CREATE TABLE `ref_product` (
`id` DOUBLE ,
`name` VARCHAR (765),
`familyid` DOUBLE ); 

INSERT INTO `ref_product` (`id`, `name`, `familyid`) VALUES('264','Old Red Fixture 1','4');
INSERT INTO `ref_product` (`id`, `name`, `familyid`) VALUES('30206','Modern Red Fixture 2','405');


CREATE TABLE `ref_tag` (
`TagID` DOUBLE ,
`TagName` VARCHAR (150)); 

INSERT INTO `ref_tag` (`TagID`, `TagName`) VALUES('103','Modern Contemporary');
INSERT INTO `ref_tag` (`TagID`, `TagName`) VALUES('131','Red');

CREATE TABLE `ref_tagmap` (
`MapID` DOUBLE ,
`tagid` DOUBLE ,
`containertype` VARCHAR (45),
`containerid` DOUBLE ); 

INSERT INTO `ref_tagmap` (`MapID`, `tagid`, `containertype`, `containerid`) VALUES('17035','131','PROD','264');
INSERT INTO `ref_tagmap` (`MapID`, `tagid`, `containertype`, `containerid`) VALUES('17747','131','PROD','30206');
INSERT INTO `ref_tagmap` (`MapID`, `tagid`, `containertype`, `containerid`) VALUES('31959','103','PROD','30206');

Querying these tables using:

SELECT DISTINCT ref_product.familyid,ref_tag.tagid
FROM (ref_tag,ref_product)
JOIN ref_tagmap AS mt2 ON  mt2.containerid=ref_product.id
AND  mt2.containertype='PROD'
AND  mt2.tagid=ref_tag.tagid 
AND ref_tag.tagname='red'

correctly returns all of the product familyids that have the tag 'red' mapped to them. Similarly:

SELECT DISTINCT ref_product.familyid,ref_tag.tagid
FROM (ref_tag,ref_product)
JOIN ref_tagmap AS mt1 ON mt1.containerid=ref_product.id
AND mt1.containertype='PROD'
AND mt1.tagid=ref_tag.tagid 
AND LCASE(ref_tag.tagname)='modern contemporary'

correctly returns the product familyids that have the tag 'modern contemporary' mapped to them. QUESTION IS, HOW DO I RETURN A LIST OF ONLY THE PRODUCT FAMILYIDS THAT HAVE BOTH TAGS MAPPED TO THEM?

I'm trying this, and it returns empty:

SELECT DISTINCT ref_product.familyid,ref_tag.tagid
FROM (ref_tag,ref_product)
JOIN ref_tagmap AS mt2 ON  mt2.containerid=ref_product.id
AND  mt2.containertype='PROD'
AND  mt2.tagid=ref_tag.tagid 
AND ref_tag.tagname='red'
JOIN ref_tagmap AS mt1 ON mt1.containerid=ref_product.id
AND mt1.containertype='PROD'
AND mt1.tagid=ref_tag.tagid 
AND LCASE(ref_tag.tagname)='modern contemporary'

I have to assume I'm missing something fundamental here...feeling dense. Please help.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The typical way to do this is to ensure that the number of distinct items in the tag table is equal to the number of tags you wish to isolate.
Example:

SELECT p.familyid
FROM   ref_product p
       JOIN ref_tagmap tm ON tm.containerid=p.id
       AND tm.containertype='PROD'
       JOIN ref_tag t ON t.tagid = tm.tagid
       AND t.tagname IN ('red',
                         'modern contemporary')
GROUP BY p.familyid 
HAVING count(DISTINCT t.tagid) = 2;

In action: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/f377e/7

share|improve this answer
    
Bernie, thanks for the reply...but I'm not sure this will help. I'm trying to isolate how to structure this little clause...which is part of a much, much larger query with a dozen or so conditions (and several more joined tables and I'm already grouping on something else.) So I'm trying to understand if there is a way to strictly limit the results returned to only those that have both tags mapped. Any other way to skin this cat? –  OldSchool Jun 15 '12 at 1:33
    
I'll add that I really don't need to return the tag_id or tag_name, just the product.familyid that is tagged by all passed tags. –  OldSchool Jun 15 '12 at 1:44
    
You are most welcome. Please note that you can use this query as a subquery in your outer query. Either join to it (some call this a derived table) or use it as a correlated subquery (in the WHERE clause of the outer query). –  bernie Jun 15 '12 at 2:04
    
Bernie, not sure if you're still following this thread, but I just had a chance to revisit this outstanding issue and, as suspected, rewriting the logic as a subquery pushed the execution time from milliseconds to over ten minutes (this has been my experience with almost all MySQL subqueries). Including your grouped by code in any manner beyond a simple where in (subquery) is beyond me, despite my research into correlated queries and derived tables...could I trouble you for an example? Do you think these variations on the code would perform acceptably? –  OldSchool Jun 20 '12 at 23:46

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