Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is gcc 4.4.6 on Linux.

Here's the behavior

bizarre.c

double a[500000000];

main() {
}

If I compile this using:

gcc bizarre.c

Then the compiler uses 4G of memory, and takes a long time.

If I make the array size 50000000, the the compilation takes considerably less memory and time.

It's like the compiler is executing the code that it's compiling.

I realize that creating a humongous array this way might not be best practice, but any explanations?

share|improve this question
    
You compiling as 32 or 64 bit executable? –  Mike Kwan Jun 15 '12 at 1:09
    
no optimization flags? you are going to run into a stack overflow more than likely... with optimization turned on, this variable is probably eliminated if using optimization higher than -O0 –  user195488 Jun 15 '12 at 1:12
    
@0A0D: this array is getting stuffed in the .bss section anyway, no stack involved... –  sarnold Jun 15 '12 at 1:17
    
64bit. No stack overflow, as it's a global. –  Alan Jun 15 '12 at 1:21
1  
@leppie, no, because the BSS section simply stores the sizes of the data objects to be instantiated with zero bytes. The version with one 0 removed compiles to 8355 bytes on my system, and I'd expect the version with the 0 put back to compile to within 32 bytes of this size -- probably identical size. –  sarnold Jun 18 '12 at 23:10
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's a known linker bug related to --build-id, now fixed on mainline. See http://sourceware.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=12451 Some distros took an earlier patch of Nick's that needlessly calculated a checksum over .bss, requiring the .bss section to be allocated and zeroed. Complain to your distro.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.