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MyString::Find that finds a string in a larger string and returns the starting location of the substring. Note that your string location starts from 0 and ends at length -1. If the string is not found, a value of -1 will be returned.

MyString::Substring(start, length). This method returns a substring of the original string that contains the same characters as the original string starting at location start and is as long as length.

My functions in the .cpp file are:

  MyString MyString::Substring(int start, int length)
 {
    char* sub;
    sub = new char[length+1];


    while(start != '\0')
    {
            for(int i = start; i < length+1; i++)
            {
                    sub[i] = String[i];
            }
    }
    return MyString(sub);
 }


 const int MyString::Find(const MyString& other)
 {
    int start(0);

    int counter(0);

    int end = other.Size;

    int end1 = Size;

    int nfound = -1;

   if(end > end1)
    {
            return nfound;
    }
    int i = 0, j = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < end1; i++)
    {
            for(j = 0; j < end; j++)
            {
                    if( ((i+j) >= end1) || (String[i+j] != other.String[j]) )
                    {
                            break;
                    }




            }
            if(j == end)
            {
                    return i;
            }




    }

    return nfound;

   }

The calling of the functions in the main.cpp file are:

      cout << "Please enter two strings. ";
      cout << "Each string needs to be shorter than 256 characters or terminated by /\n." << endl;
     cout << "The first string will be searched to see whether it contains exactly the second string. " << endl;

     cin >> SearchString >> TargetString; // Test of cascaded string-extraction operator



     if(SearchString.Find(TargetString) == -1) {
       cout << TargetString << " is not in " << SearchString << endl;
  } else {
       cout << TargetString << " is in " << SearchString << endl;
       cout << "Details of the hit: " << endl;
       cout << "Starting poisition of the hit: " << SearchString.Find(TargetString) << endl;
       cout << "The matching substring is: " << SearchString.Substring(SearchString.Find(TargetString), TargetString.Length());
 }

When compiled and ran, I get:

Please enter two strings. Each string needs to be shorter than 256 characters or terminated by / . The first string will be searched to see whether it contains exactly the second string.

find

in

in is in find

Details of the hit:

Starting poisition of the hit: 1 ^C

I end up having to abort the program using control C, but I'm sure there is something wrong with my code, that I'm simply not seeing. Help please! What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
I think you have omitted a lot of detail. –  user845279 Jun 15 '12 at 5:28

1 Answer 1

The problem lies in the Substring method. You are using a while loop which is continuing forever. You might be looking for something like the snippet below.

 MyString MyString::Substring(int start, int length)
 {
    char* sub;
    sub = new char[length+1];

    for(int i = start; i < length+1; i++)
    {
        sub[i] = String[i];
    }

    return MyString(sub);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Ha! That helped! Thank you, I don't know how I missed that! Now when I run it, it looks like this: "The matching substring is: ðäZ" which is jibberish to me, any thoughts? –  user1363061 Jun 15 '12 at 20:48
    
My C++ is kind of rusty but I think you are missing the new keyword in front of the return statement. It should be return new MyString(sub);. According to a quick Google search, without the new keyword the constructor is not called. That would cause the contents of the returned MyString.String to be random data and not the data in sub. –  Jesse Harris Jun 16 '12 at 19:59
    
Aha! Thank you for that! Also, I am not supposed to have any memory leaks, so I'm curious would this cause any? I don't have delete anywhere in the function but it seemed crazy to put delete in there and then try to return it. I'm just confused on that –  user1363061 Jun 16 '12 at 22:32
    
Also with the edits you've suggested, I got a conversion error from class to a non scalar?? –  user1363061 Jun 16 '12 at 22:36
    
I Googled your conversion error and I think it is because you are not returning the pointer. Something like return * new MyString(sub); My C++ skills are weak. Now that you have made some progress I would recommend closing this question and asking another one based on the latest issue you are encountering. You might get some more eyes on it with better C++ skills. –  Jesse Harris Jun 17 '12 at 7:07

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