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(define get-first
  (lambda (l)
    (call-with-current-continuation
      (lambda (here)
        (set! leave here)
        (waddle l)
        (leave (quote ()))))))

(define get-first
  (lambda (l)
    (call-with-current-continuation
      (lambda (here)
        (set! leave here)
        (leave (waddle l))))))

For anybody not familiar with "The Seasoned Schemer", get-first, get-next, and waddle (last two not defined here) are procedures to apparently model coroutines to iterate through a tree passed to waddle that yields leaves only. Just prior to waddle's yield on it's second to last re-entry, it sets the re-entry point to where it will only ever return the pure value '() i.e. instead of yielding '() , the actual value of waddle IS '() , as if it were a pure function all along. With this in mind, we can see what get-first sets up... when waddle returns "for real", it will be inside the call/cc in get-first and then (leave (quote ())) is the value of get-first (and, in turn, this leave is intended to return to get-next on the last iteration, therefore get-next does the "actual" return of '()). So why is the second version not equivalent, where waddle's value of '() would be the argument to leave?

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Nevermind... the confusion is because "leave" is not the function I want it to be, but the function it evaluates to when its evaluated, which appears to be left-to-right and thus before "waddle". That means it evaluates to what it was just set to in the statement prior. Moral: beware when using functions that are subject to redefining WITHIN the call to the function! If this was on a right-to-left interpreter, waddle would be evaluated before the symbol leave was looked up as the function that leaves to wherever, during which time it would be set to a DIFFERENT function. What a mess... –  user1457584 Jun 15 '12 at 3:20
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Glad to hear it's resolved, but please post the resolution as an answer (rather than a comment here), and accept it. That way people can see the question is resolved without coming in here. –  Bridge Jun 15 '12 at 11:58
    
@user1457584 both versions won't compile: set!: unbound identifier in module in: leave –  alfasin Jul 12 '12 at 3:06
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1 Answer

The confusion is because "leave" is not the function I want it to be, but the function it evaluates to when its evaluated, which appears to be left-to-right and thus before "waddle". That means it evaluates to what it was just set to in the statement prior. Moral: beware when using functions that are subject to redefining WITHIN the call to the function! If this was on a right-to-left interpreter, waddle would be evaluated before the symbol leave was looked up as the function that leaves to wherever, during which time it would be set to a DIFFERENT function.

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You should mark your question answered, even though you wrote the answer. Otherwise it shows up on the unanswered list. –  espertus Apr 30 at 1:38
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