Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically my problem is that i'm trying to change the value inside the valor variable, so that after calling of the cambiar_valor function it chenges to 25. But my problem is that it doesn't chang at all. What am i doing wrong here?. I'm trying to make a really generic function so that depending of the data type i pass to the function it changes dinamically. In this case is an integer type but what i'm trying to do here is to check if i could change the value of the valor variable inside the function

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void cambiar_valor(void* valor,int* valor_dos) {//assign valor_dos to valor
    valor = valor_dos;
}

int main() {
    void *valor;
    int *valor_dos = 25;
    cambiar_valor(valor,valor_dos);
    printf("%d \n",(int*)valor);//this should show 25
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

int *valor_dos = 25

This statement is incorrect. You are declaring a pointer here, so you cannot assign a value (25) to it.

share|improve this answer
    
You can do this (this is C, after all), but it's just a Very Bad Idea. –  templatetypedef Jun 15 '12 at 4:28
    
Yes you can do this. Pointers are just integers. –  user529758 Jun 15 '12 at 4:29
1  
@templatetypedef Exactly, one of C's strengths is also one of its major weaknesses, it will happily do whatever you ask it to do :-/ –  Levon Jun 15 '12 at 4:30
    
You can assign anything without problem. The problem is when you dereference the pointer. If you are lucky (or unlucky when you are debugging), you will not get a SEGFAULT. –  nhahtdh Jun 15 '12 at 4:30
    
However, the convention is to use hex notation whenever assigning an integer value to a pointer, addresses are always expressed in hex. If the code doesn't use hex notation, but as in this case decimal, then it is most likely a bug. –  Lundin Jun 15 '12 at 6:24

In your function

void cambiar_valor(void* valor,int* valor_dos) {//assign valor_dos to valor
    valor = valor_dos;
}

You are passing in the pointers by value, meaning that valor and valor_dos are copies of the parameters you pass in. Reassigning valor inside the function has no effect on the calling function.

To fix this, take the parameters in by pointer:

void cambiar_valor(void** valor, int* valor_dos) {//assign valor_dos to valor
    *valor = valor_dos;
}

Then call

cambiar_valor(&valor, valor_dos);

Also, as @Levon has mentioned, your initialization of valor_dos in main is incorrect and will probably cause a segfault at runtime. You might want to change that as well.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
It works now, but i'd like to know wich is the best way to declare the pointer because of what you said, i always thought that when i do int* valor_dos = 25i'm changing the value inside the valor_dosvariable and not it's pointer. –  mayhem Jun 15 '12 at 4:59
    
mayhem, doing int* valor_dos = 25; set the pointer to address 25, doing int* valor_dos; *valor_dos = 25; let the pointer undefined and write 25 at an undefined address. The closest correct match to you want to do is int v; int* valor_dos = &v; *valor_dos = 25 which will set the pointer to a place where you are allowed to write, then write 25 there. You could also do a malloc() instead of instantiating v, but dynamic allocation is more difficult to handle if you are a beginner in C. –  calandoa Jun 15 '12 at 12:47

Here

 int *valor_dos = 25;

you are initializing a pointer to an int with the value 25 .. I.e.,it points at memory location 25, that can only lead to trouble. I'm surprised you didn't get a seg fault.

share|improve this answer
2  
There's no segfault because the pointer wasn't reassigned. The union of our two answers I think is the right answer. :-) –  templatetypedef Jun 15 '12 at 4:27
    
@templatetypedef Happy to share the rep points ;-) –  Levon Jun 15 '12 at 4:28
    
@templatetypedef: Please edit your post X_X –  nhahtdh Jun 15 '12 at 4:33
    
@nhathdh- Sorry... is there an error in the post? I'm not sure what you want me to change. –  templatetypedef Jun 15 '12 at 4:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.