Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im trying to create a list of classes for a degree plan at my university where when classes that have been taken are checked another class gets highlighted to let the user know that class has all of the prerequisites met to be taken. so if i check calculus 1, physics 1 will get highlighted.

Im new to C# and i dont have a heavy knowledge of what the language and .NET framework can do so im asking for a good simple straight answer, if you could explain exactly what is going on in the code that would be fantastic. Thanks

heres what i have so far. just a basic proof of concept WPF

<Window x:Class="degree_plan.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="Degree Planner" Height="350" Width="525" Name="Degree">
    <Grid>
        <CheckBox Content="Math 1412" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="34,40,0,0" Name="checkBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
        <CheckBox Content="Physics 1911" Height="16" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="34,62,0,0" Name="checkBox2" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
    </Grid>
</Window>

and heres the c# code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows.Documents;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Navigation; 
using System.Windows.Shapes;

namespace degree_plan
   {
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
   public partial class MainWindow : Window
   {
      public MainWindow()
      {
        InitializeComponent();

       // if (checkBox1.Checked)
         //   Console.WriteLine("physics 1");

    }
  }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can register an event handler for the checkboxes:

AddHandler(CheckBox.CheckedEvent, new RoutedEventHandler(CheckBox_Click));

then, create the event handler:

private void CheckBox_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    CheckBox checkbox = e.Source as CheckBox
    //...
}

The checkbox variable in the event handler is the checkbox which was clicked to raise the event. You can check which checkbox it was, and then enable all the options which depend on it.

share|improve this answer
    
I honestly have no idea what any of that is –  π-e Jun 15 '12 at 5:26
    
@user1457814 You should probably start with an easier task. You need to learn what different stuff like data-binding and event-handlers are before you can tackle something like this. –  McGarnagle Jun 15 '12 at 5:28
    
You put the AddHandler statement in the constructor for your window. It registers a method for WPF to call whenever any checkbox in the window is clicked -- so whenever the method gets called, something's happened to the checkboxes and you can update them –  Carson Myers Jun 15 '12 at 5:28
    
the idea seemed a lot easier in theory i guess. i didn't realize it would take a whole lot more knowledge than i have thus far acquired. –  π-e Jun 15 '12 at 5:34
1  
@user1457814 I just started into WPF myself, it was quite intimidating at first. I bought a book though and am working on it -- event handlers aren't too scary though, and depending on your goals for this application, it may still be within your reach –  Carson Myers Jun 15 '12 at 5:40

I know you asked for simple but at some point you can come back to this as it's a very structured and expandable way to hold and use data in WPF

I would consider quantifying the Classes in their own structure, each with a list of the prerequisite classes that must be completed before hand, I would like to suggest using the following to achieve what you're after (sorry, bit long!)

what you'll get is a list of classes represented by checkboxes, you can only check a class once all of its prerequisite classes are complete, they have names and descriptions and can be customised on the UI in anyway you want.

Create a new WPF application and add the following Class. Class.cs

public class Class : Control, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    // Property that's raised to let other clases know when a property has changed.
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    // Flags to show what's going on with this class.
    bool isClassComplete;
    bool isPreComplete;

    // Some other info about the class.
    public string ClassName { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    // A list of prerequisite classes to this one.
    List<Class> prerequisites;

    // public property access to the complete class, you can only set it to true
    // if the prerequisite classes are all complete.
    public bool IsClassComplete
    {
        get { return isClassComplete; }
        set
        {
            if (isPreComplete)
                isClassComplete = value;
            else
                if (value)
                    throw new Exception("Class can't be complete, pre isn't complete");
                else
                    isClassComplete = value;

            PropertyChangedEventHandler temp = PropertyChanged;
            if (temp != null)
                temp(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("IsClassComplete"));
        }
    }

    // public readonly property access to the complete flag.
    public bool IsPreComplete { get { return isPreComplete; } }

    public Class()
    {
        prerequisites = new List<Class>();
        isPreComplete = true;
    }

    // adds a class to the prerequisites list.
    public void AddPre(Class preClass)
    {
        prerequisites.Add(preClass);
        preClass.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(preClass_PropertyChanged);
        ValidatePre();
    }

    // removes a class from the prerequisites lists.
    public void RemovePre(Class preClass)
    {
        prerequisites.Remove(preClass);
        preClass.PropertyChanged -= new PropertyChangedEventHandler(preClass_PropertyChanged);
        ValidatePre();
    }

    // each time a property changes on one of the prerequisite classes this is run.
    void preClass_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        switch (e.PropertyName)
        {
            case "IsClassComplete":

                // check to see if all prerequisite classes are complete/
                ValidatePre();
                break;
        }
    }

    void ValidatePre()
    {
        if (prerequisites.Count > 0)
        {
            bool prerequisitesComplete = true;
            for (int i = 0; i < prerequisites.Count; i++)
                prerequisitesComplete &= prerequisites[i].isClassComplete;
            isPreComplete = prerequisitesComplete;
            if (!isPreComplete)
                IsClassComplete = false;
        }
        else
            isPreComplete = true;

        PropertyChangedEventHandler temp = PropertyChanged;
        if (temp != null)
            temp(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("IsPreComplete"));
    }
}

Now in the code behind for MainWindow.cs you can create a collection of classes, I've done this in the constructor and provided an observable collection of classes so when new classes are added, you don't have to do anything to get them to display on the UI

/// <summary>
/// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
/// </summary>
public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public ObservableCollection<Class> Classes
    {
        get { return (ObservableCollection<Class>)GetValue(ClassesProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ClassesProperty, value); }
    }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ClassesProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Classes", typeof(ObservableCollection<Class>), typeof(MainWindow), new UIPropertyMetadata(null));

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        Class math = new Class()
        {
            ClassName = "Math 1412",
            Description = ""
        };

        Class physics = new Class()
        {
            ClassName = "Physics 1911",
            Description = "Everything everywhere anywhen",
        };
        physics.AddPre(math);
        Classes = new ObservableCollection<Class>();
        Classes.Add(math);
        Classes.Add(physics);
    }
}

The final step is to tell WPF what a class is supposed to look like on the user interface, this is done in resources, to simplify the example, I've put it in the MainWindow.xaml file.

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication8.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication8"
        DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">

    <Window.Resources>
        <!-- This tells WPF what a class looks like -->
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type local:Class}">
            <Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:Class}">
                        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}}">
                            <!-- Checkbox and a text label. -->
                            <CheckBox  IsEnabled="{Binding IsPreComplete}" IsChecked="{Binding IsClassComplete}" />
                            <TextBlock Margin="5,0,0,0" Text="{Binding ClassName}" ToolTip="{Binding Description}"/>
                        </StackPanel>
                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
        </Style>
    </Window.Resources>


    <Grid>
        <!-- This draws the list of classes from the property in MainWindow.cs-->
        <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding Classes}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>
share|improve this answer

For your ease, try to use the 'CheckedChanged' event.. Just double click the CheckBox on the designer. Handler will be added automatically(something like,

    private void checkBox1_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }

.Then add your code there. But, this is time consuming(since, you have to add handler for each CheckBox). But, 'll be easy for you to understand at this stage.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.