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I have the requirement of developing an Android application that loads localized text from external resources outside of its primary APK.
The reason for this is to enable third-parties to independently provide translations of the application. The application currently has a single English localization with a fairly large number of strings (~2,000).

I would prefer not to break away form Android's resource system; e.g., I would like to provide the primary-language localized strings in strings.xml just like in any Android app.

To accomplish this, I have created a class which extends android.content.res.Resources, overriding the three getText methods. The overriding implementations will return resources from the external localization source when possible, and otherwise forward the request to the super.getText() implementation.

Resources wrapper:

public class IntegratedResources extends Resources {

    private ResourceIntegrator ri;

    public IntegratedResources(AssetManager assets, DisplayMetrics metrics, Configuration config, ResourceIntegrator ri) {
        super(assets, metrics, config);
        this.ri = ri;
    }

    @Override
    public CharSequence getText(int id)
            throws NotFoundException {
        return ri == null ? super.getText(id) : ri.getText(id);
    }

    @Override
    public CharSequence getText(int id, CharSequence def)
            throws NotFoundException {
        return ri == null ? super.getText(id, def) : ri.getText(id, def);
    }

    @Override
    public CharSequence[] getTextArray(int id) 
            throws NotFoundException {
        return ri == null ? super.getTextArray(id) : ri.getTextArray(id);
    }
}

I then created a ContextWrapper implementation to wrap an Activity's context. The context wrapper's getResources() method will return the IntegratedResources object above.

ContextWrapper:

public class IntegratedResourceContext extends ContextWrapper {

    private IntegratedResources integratedResources;

    public IntegratedResourceContext(Activity activity, String packageName) 
    throws NameNotFoundException {
        super(activity);

        ResourceIntegrator ri = packageName == null ? null : new ResourceIntegrator(activity, packageName);

        DisplayMetrics displayMetrics = new DisplayMetrics();
        activity.getWindow().getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay().getMetrics(displayMetrics);

        integratedResources = new IntegratedResources(activity.getAssets(), displayMetrics, 
                activity.getResources().getConfiguration(), ri);
    }

    @Override
    public Resources getResources() {
        return integratedResources;
    }
}

And finally we have the "ResourceIntegrator" class, which picks resources out of a specified installed third-party localization APK.
A different implementation could be created to pull them from an XML or properties file if desired.

ResourceIntegrator:

public class ResourceIntegrator {

    private Resources rBase;
    private Resources rExternal;
    private String externalPackageName;

    private Map<Integer, Integer> baseIdToExternalId = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    public ResourceIntegrator(Context context, String externalPackageName) 
    throws NameNotFoundException {
        super();
        rBase = context.getResources();

        this.externalPackageName = externalPackageName;

        if (externalPackageName != null) {
            PackageManager pm = context.getPackageManager();
            rExternal = pm.getResourcesForApplication(externalPackageName);
        }
    }

    public CharSequence getText(int id, CharSequence def) {
        if (rExternal == null) {
            return rBase.getText(id, def);
        }

        Integer externalId = baseIdToExternalId.get(id);
        if (externalId == null) {
            // Not loaded yet.
            externalId = loadExternal(id);
        }

        if (externalId == 0) {
            // Resource does not exist in external resources, return from base.
            return rBase.getText(id, def);
        } else {
            // Resource has a value in external resources, return it.
            return rExternal.getText(externalId);
        }
    }

    public CharSequence getText(int id)
    throws NotFoundException {
        if (rExternal == null) {
            return rBase.getText(id);
        }

        Integer externalId = baseIdToExternalId.get(id);
        if (externalId == null) {
            // Not loaded yet.
            externalId = loadExternal(id);
        }

        if (externalId == 0) {
            // Resource does not exist in external resources, return from base.
            return rBase.getText(id);
        } else {
            // Resource has a value in external resources, return it.
            return rExternal.getText(externalId);
        }
    }

    public CharSequence[] getTextArray(int id)
    throws NotFoundException {
        if (rExternal == null) {
            return rBase.getTextArray(id);
        }

        Integer externalId = baseIdToExternalId.get(id);
        if (externalId == null) {
            // Not loaded yet.
            externalId = loadExternal(id);
        }

        if (externalId == 0) {
            // Resource does not exist in external resources, return from base.
            return rBase.getTextArray(id);
        } else {
            // Resource has a value in external resources, return it.
            return rExternal.getTextArray(externalId);
        }
    }

    private int loadExternal(int baseId) {
        int externalId;

        try {
            String entryName = rBase.getResourceEntryName(baseId);
            String typeName = rBase.getResourceTypeName(baseId);
            externalId = rExternal.getIdentifier(entryName, typeName, externalPackageName);
        } catch (NotFoundException ex) {
            externalId = 0;
        }

        baseIdToExternalId.put(baseId, externalId);
        return externalId;
    }
}

My question to stackoverflow is whether the above implementation is a good idea, whether it's using the API properly, and whether its design is future-proof against the unknown versions of Android of tomorrow.
I've not seen anyone doing this before, and can't seem to find anything about solving this problem in the docs or on the web.

The underlying requirement of allowing independent third-party translations is fairly critical. It is not currently feasible to internally maintain dozens of translations for this application, and I have no capability to vet user-provided translations for quality.
In the case that this design is a very bad idea and no similar alternative is available, then localization may have to be done without Android's resource-management system altogether.

In the event that this is a good idea, please feel free to use and improve the above code.

share|improve this question
    
So what's the difference between "independent third-party translations" and the "user-provided translations" which you don't have the capicty to vet? If you have 'independent third-parties' willing to provide translations for your app, why don't you just add them as locale-specific translations along the way as you provide app updates? –  Squonk Jun 15 '12 at 5:48
    
There's no difference between "independent third-party translations" and "user-provided translations", I'm talking about the same thing and should have referred to it by the same term each time. I'm specifically trying to avoid adding them to our APK, because while I'm enormously appreciative of people doing this, I have absolutely no idea of the quality of the work. I'm worried about this as I see how poor the spelling and grammar can be in English applications authored by English-speaking developers. –  tliebeck Jun 15 '12 at 6:30
    
I understand to an extent...however, the problem I have with your approach is you are still putting trust in the "independent" third-parties (whoever they may be) and any errors that they may introduce (poor grammar or spelling) will still reflect on your app. Working on the principle that your intention is to allow the download of translations via a network connection, at this point somebody who doesn't speak English is going to be 'told' they need to connect to somewhere to download translations in their own language...except they won't understand what they're being told. –  Squonk Jun 15 '12 at 6:55
    
It will be made very clear that the translations are offered by third parties. They'll have to be downloaded separately, either via the Play store or some internal download mechanism. In any case there will be a localized notice informing the user that the localization is being provided by a third party. I'm much more concerned with whether the implementation above is using the API correctly. In past experience, maintaining contributed localizations has been a nightmare. For this app I'm willing to go to a lot of trouble to keep them external. –  tliebeck Jun 15 '12 at 8:24

2 Answers 2

My question to stackoverflow is whether the above is a good idea

I will be stunned if it is a complete solution, since you cannot force Android to use your custom ContextWrapper. It should work for any place where you manually call getString(), getText(), and the like, but I do not see how it will work anywhere that Android accesses those resources beyond one of your activities. There are many places where you cannot call getText() and so on yourself, such as:

  • the home screen launcher
  • the information for your app in Settings
  • the recent tasks list

Moreover, you will have perpetual versioning problems, unless you plan to never add new strings. You have no way of forcing third-party translations to support new strings, and so you will wind up with an app with a mix of translated and non-translated strings.

whether it's using the API properly

That seems OK.

whether its design is future-proof against the unknown versions of Android of tomorrow

The number of places where Android will access the resources itself is likely to increase, rather than decrease.

It is not currently feasible to internally maintain dozens of translations for this application, and I have no capability to vet user-provided translations for quality.

Then only support languages that you are willing to manage yourself. First, as I have noted, I do not see how this will be a complete solution, on a couple of fronts. Second, you seem to think that your approach will cause you to not be blamed for poor translations, and while it will probably reduce how much blame you get, it will not eliminate such blame. I agree with Squonk in this regard.

I admire your zeal for offering more translations, but, personally, I wouldn't go down this particular path.

share|improve this answer
    
My apologies for this, but in re-reading my question I realize I made a bit of a mistake in how I asked it. I'm really trying to figure out whether the above implementation is sound and reasonably future-proof. (I've edited the question slightly now as a result). I'm actually pretty set on wanting to support third-party translations. The particular app in question is commonly used by very technical folks, and I've already had several people kindly pull the resources out and send me translated versions. I can't maintain them, but don't want to reject them. –  tliebeck Jun 15 '12 at 10:43
    
@tliebeck: As I indicated, it is not sound, insofar as it is not complete, and it is not future-proof, insofar as the areas where it is not complete will likely expand. –  CommonsWare Jun 15 '12 at 10:48
    
With regard to the technical issues, it's acceptable to have Android reference the app in English, and in any case where it's not it wouldn't be too rough to have translations of system-used strings. The key is that all of the application's own activities reliably use the ContextWrapper when so configured. –  tliebeck Jun 15 '12 at 10:49

I don't think your technique will work for resource references in layouts. These are resolved by the LayoutInflater and ultimately by the TypedArray implementation, which invokes private methods to load the resources.

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