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Behaviour of Sizeof in C

Can somebody explain why the following piece of C code behaves as it does:

#include <stdio.h>

int sizeof_func(int data[]) {
    return sizeof(data);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int test_array[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
    int array_size = sizeof(test_array);
    printf("size of test_array : %d.\n", array_size);
    int func_array_size = sizeof_func(test_array);
    printf("size of test_array from function : %d.\n",
        func_array_size);
    if (array_size == func_array_size) {
        printf("sizes match.\n");
    } else {
        printf("sizes don't match.\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

I expected the output to be:

size of test_array : 16.
size of test_array from function : 16.
sizes match.

But instead I got:

size of test_array : 16.
size of test_array from function : 4.
sizes don't match.
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marked as duplicate by David Grayson, David Brown, AndreyT, davidk01, paxdiablo Jun 15 '12 at 7:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
   int test_array[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
   int array_size = sizeof(test_array);
   printf("size of test_array : %d.\n", array_size);

Here the compiler considers test_array as an array (it knows about the real size of the array at compile time) that's why you get the true size of test_array.

   int func_array_size = sizeof_func(test_array);
   printf("size of test_array from function : %d.\n",
   func_array_size);

However if you pass an array to a function the compiler sees it as a pointer to the first element of the array (at compile-time your function don't know about the size of the array because you can call your function with any array that you have previously declared) that's why you're getting the size of a pointer.

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When you pass an array as function argument it decays in to a pointer to its first element.
sizeof in function returns size of the pointer not the array.
While, sizeof in the main() returns size of the array. Naturally, both are not the same.

If you want to know the size of the array in the function you will have to pass it as an separate argument to the function.

int sizeof_func(int data[], size_t arrSize);
                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^
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Your function is equivalent to:

int sizeof_func(int *data) {
    return sizeof(data);
}

There is no way for your function to know anything about the size of the array that was passed to it, because all that actually gets passed to it is a pointer to the first element of the array. You are on a 32 bit system, so the sizeof(int *) is 4.

In fact, sizeof(...) is a constant that gets evaluated at compile time, so there is no way your sizeof_func could ever work. Instead, what people often do in C is pass an integer around with the pointer, like this:

int function_that_operates_on_array(int *data, int size)
{
    // do stuff with data[0] through data[size-1]
}
share|improve this answer

you definition of function is,

int sizeof_func(int data[])

{

return sizeof(data);

}

which is incorrect for your case, as you are passing pointer to first element of array as argument in your function call. e.g. int func_array_size = sizeof_func(test_array);

modify your function definition as give below,

int sizeof_func(int *data, int arraysize)

{

 return (sizeof(data) * arraysize); 

}

And modify your function call as, int func_array_size = sizeof_func(test_array, 4);

this should work.

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There are two C language issues you need to be aware of.

1) behavior of the sizeof operator. It only works on array with a static size. If you have sizeof(test_array), then it will work for real arrays:

int test_array[]  = { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; 
int test_array[4] = { 1, 2, 3, 4 }; // completely equivalent
char test_array[] = "something";

It will not work when you pass a pointer to it. If you do, you will get the size of a pointer. The following cases will not work, they will print 4 (assuming 32bit):

int*  pointer = test_array;
char* pointer = "something";
printf("%d", sizeof(pointer));

2) The behavior of function parameters. These have a strange syntax in C. They can be declared to look like arrays, but they are not:

void func (int* x);    // x is a pointer
void func (int x[]);   // x is a pointer
void func (int x[10]); // x is a pointer

The above 3 are equivalent, the latter two are just "syntatic sugar" to tell describe the intentions of the programmer.

In all these cases, any attempt to call sizeof(x) will give the size of a pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
The C FAQ on this topic is excellent reading. –  Lundin Jun 15 '12 at 7:03

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