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I am practicing this https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Canvas_tutorial/Basic_animations Clock tutorial. Everything in the code is clear to me. Accept this hr = hr>=12 ? hr-12 : hr; is not clear me. May be i am write it's a if else statement.

Can any explain what this code is doing.

Thanks :)

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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is the ternary operator (?:) Here is the simple explanation of what is being done here:

if(hr>=12)
{
    hr=hr-12;
}
//or else hr will have its same value
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1  
Thanks for the help :) I will accept it after 8min –  sandeep Jun 15 '12 at 6:36
    
you are welcome –  vaibhav Jun 15 '12 at 6:46
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if (hr >= 12) {
   hr = hr - 12;
} 

if hr does not meet that criteria hr should effectively be left untouched.

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its called Ternary operation

It means

if(hr>=12)
 hr=hr-12;
else
 hr=hr;

the following is enough

if(hr>=12)
     hr=hr-12;
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3  
There is no point in doing the final else with hr=hr. –  Russell Dias Jun 15 '12 at 6:33
2  
I agree , its just to explain the statment –  Rab Nawaz Jun 15 '12 at 6:36
1  
Your edit makes it clear now :) –  Russell Dias Jun 15 '12 at 6:40
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It's a ternary operator, of the form:

condition ? if_true | if_false 

If you add more brackets for readibility, it can become:

hr = ( (hr >= 12) ? (hr - 12) : hr )

That is, if more than 12, subtract 12, and store back to hr.

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Thanks for the help :) –  sandeep Jun 15 '12 at 6:37
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hr= hr>=12 ? hr-12 : hr; is same to if( hr >= 12 ) hr = hr-12 else hr = hr;

the bool ? expr_a : expr_b is a operator that when bool is true, expr_a is evaluated and its value will be used as the whole expr's value, otherwise the expr_b will be.

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It means:

if(hr>=12)
{
  hr = hr - 12;
}

Generally:

x= condition ? y : z

if condition is true, then x = y, else x = z

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It has same effect as this:

hr %= 12;   //equivalent to -> hr = hr>=12 ? hr-12 : hr;
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That's actually brilliant in this application. Except that it doesn't do exactly this - for when hr=25, your option gives 1 while his gives 13, so it's not exactly equivalent. –  qdot Jun 15 '12 at 11:07
    
@qdot By 'same effect', I meant in this context it has same effect, where hr is hours, and can't have values outside of [0,23] range. –  Engineer Jun 15 '12 at 11:21
    
Or it misses the potential for validity check - if after this operation it doesn't fit in the [0,11] range, then it's clearly invalid. Your approach allows large positive integers to slip through. –  qdot Jun 15 '12 at 13:49
    
@qdot C'mon dude, for what 'validity' are you thinking about? Did you see the example-> var hr = now.getHours();, where now is Date object. link-> developer.mozilla.org/en/Canvas_tutorial/Basic_animations –  Engineer Jun 15 '12 at 13:56
    
yeah, I saw the example, but it's clearly meant as something of an educational value - there is no need to be angry about it, your comment is clearly brilliant in this application, but it's clearly not equivalent - sometimes you can use this for sanitizing input values from a form, and then check whether it fits the [0,11] range - in which case your answer is not equivalent. There is nothing improper about it in this context, but it's definitely not equivalent –  qdot Jun 15 '12 at 13:58
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It's called a ternary operator.

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