Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have written the following code

 class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Circle c1 = new Circle(5);
        Circle c2 = new Circle(10);
        Console.WriteLine(c1.Area().ToString());
        if (c1>c2)
        {
        }
    }
}
public class Circle:System.IComparable<Circle>,IComparable
{
    public int radius { get;private set; }
    public double Area()
    {
        return Math.PI * radius * radius;
    }
    public Circle(int radius)
    {
        this.radius = radius;
    }
    public int CompareTo(Circle c)
    {
        if (c.Area() == this.Area())
            return 0;
        if (c.Area() > this.Area())
            return 1;
        return -1;
    }
    public int CompareTo(Object c)
    {
        if (((Circle)c).Area() == this.Area())
            return 0;
        if (((Circle)c).Area() > this.Area())
            return 1;
        return -1;
    }
}

However it the error Error 1 Operator '>' cannot be applied to operands of type 'ConsoleApplication1.Circle' and 'ConsoleApplication1.Circle'

i have implemented both the methods and could not figure the error

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Implementing IComparable does not by itself create the >, >=, <, <= operators for the class. If you want those operators to be usable with you class, you have to implement them:

public static bool operator > (Circle x, Circle y) {
   return x.CompareTo(y) > 0;
}

// and so on for the other operators

If you decide to create these operators, you might also want to overload the .Equals method and the == operator so that your Circle object will in practise exhibit value type behavior under comparison operations.

Also, since the Area is directly proportional to the radius, you might to well to compare radiuses (? spelling) instead of areas.

share|improve this answer
    
IComparable does not say 1, 0, -1 - it says <0, 0, >0. As a general example, this should be phrased as >0, not ==1 –  Marc Gravell Jun 15 '12 at 8:24
    
Good point. Changed. –  user1429080 Jun 15 '12 at 8:54

You'd need to overload the > operator to do what you're trying:

  public static bool operator > (Circle c1, Circle c2)
  {
     return (c1.CompareTo(C2) > 0);
  }  
share|improve this answer
    
Pedantry: you don't override operators; you overload them –  Marc Gravell Jun 15 '12 at 7:30
1  
"IComparable is only for checking equality" - this is not true. But as you said, you still need to implement operator <. –  Henrik Jun 15 '12 at 7:30
    
@MarcGravell of course you're correct. Need caffeine... –  Dave Jun 15 '12 at 7:30
    
In the given example - isn't that a circular reference? CompareTo invokes > in it ? –  Tisho Jun 15 '12 at 7:32
    
@Tisho the > in CompareTo is acting on the Area() function which returns double; the override I've provided only acts on Circles –  Dave Jun 15 '12 at 7:45

Implementing IComparable or IComparable<T> does not automatically enable the use of comparison operators. You have to specifically provide their implementation. Most of the other answers (at the time of this answer) provide incorrect or incomplete implementations of the operators.

You will need to begin by fixing your CompareTo implementations. The first fix is to make sure you handle null cases. An object always compares greater than null per specifications (see docs):

public int CompareTo(Circle c)
{
    return c == null ? 1 : CompareAreas(this.Area(), c.Area());
}
public int CompareAreas(double a, double b)
{
    return a > b ? 1 : a == b ? 0 : -1;
}

The non-generic version of CompareTo also needs to handle comparison with null and otherwise making sure that it is being indeed compared to a Circle object:

public int CompareTo(Object obj)
{
    if (obj == null) return 1;
    var c = obj as Circle;
    if (c == null) throw new ArgumentException(null, "obj");
    return CompareTo(c); // delegate to CompareTo(Circle)
}

Finally, the > and < operator implementations need to account for one or both sides being null:

public static bool operator >(Circle a, Circle b)
{
    return Compare(a, b) > 0;
}
public static bool operator <(Circle a, Circle b)
{
    return Compare(a, b) < 0;
}
public static int Compare(Circle a, Circle b)
{
    return a == null && b == null ? 0 : a == null ? 1 : a.CompareTo(b);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a better answer than than mine (which is currently accepted) since the subject of the question is "IComparable Implementation". +1 –  user1429080 Jun 15 '12 at 10:47
public static bool operator < (Circle c1, Circle c2)
{
    return compare(c1, c2) < 0;
}

public static bool operator > (Circle c1, Circle c2)
{
    return compare(c1, c2) > 0;
}

public static bool operator == (Circle c1, Circle c2)
{
    return compare(c1, c2) == 0;
}

public static int compare(Circle c1, Circle c2)
{
    return c1.radius.CompareTo(c2.radius);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanx that solves the problem –  akshita2gud Jun 15 '12 at 7:41

Another solution could be implementing IComparable for Circle type too. In that case, you can do , for example:

.....

if (c.Area().CompareTo(this.Area()) == 0)
     return 0;

.....
share|improve this answer

The problems in your code:
(1) You should override operator > to use it with 2 Circle objects.
(2) In the compare method, you should return a value indicating the distance between the to Circle objects rather than just 1 or -1 or 0 .
(3) You should call Area() method once and save its value, then use this value when needed rather than all this method every time when you need.

public class Circle : System.IComparable<Circle>
{
    public int radius { get; private set; }
    public double Area()
    {
        return Math.PI * radius * radius;
    }
    public Circle(int radius)
    {
        this.radius = radius;
    }
    public int CompareTo(Circle c)
    {
        //you should not just return 1 or -1, you should return a value indicating their "distance"
        return (int)(this.Area() - c.Area());
    }
    public static bool operator >(Circle a, Circle b)
    {
        return a.CompareTo(b) > 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.