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This is an interview question

I think of a solution. It uses queue.

public Void BFS()    
{   
   Queue q = new Queue();    
   q.Enqueue(root);    
   Console.WriteLine(root.Value);  

   while (q.count > 0)  
   {  
      Node n = q.DeQueue();  
      if (n.left !=null)  
       {  
          Console.Writeln(n.left);  
          q.EnQueue(n.left);  
        }   
       if (n.right !=null)  
       {  
          Console.Writeln(n.right);  
          q.EnQueue(n.right);  
        }   
    }
}

Can anything think of better solution than this, which doesn't use Queue?

share|improve this question
    
I'd be surprised if anyone had a solution that was more readable than a BFS of the tree... – Eric Jul 9 '09 at 15:40
    
up vote 30 down vote accepted

Level by level traversal is known as Breadth-first traversal. Using a Queue is the proper way to do this. If you wanted to do a depth first traversal you would use a stack.

The way you have it is not quite standard though. Here's how it should be.

public Void BFS()    
{      
 Queue q = new Queue();
 q.Enqueue(root);//You don't need to write the root here, it will be written in the loop
 while (q.count > 0)
 {
    Node n = q.DeQueue();
    Console.Writeln(n.Value); //Only write the value when you dequeue it
    if (n.left !=null)
    {
        q.EnQueue(n.left);//enqueue the left child
    }
    if (n.right !=null)
    {
       q.EnQueue(n.right);//enque the right child
    }
 }
}

Edit

Here's the algorithm at work. Say you had a tree like so:

     1
    / \
   2   3
  /   / \
 4   5   6

First, the root (1) would be enqueued. The loop is then entered. first item in queue (1) is dequeued and printed. 1's children are enqueued from left to right, the queue now contains {2, 3} back to start of loop first item in queue (2) is dequeued and printed 2's children are enqueued form left to right, the queue now contains {3, 4} back to start of loop ...

The queue will contain these values over each loop

1: {1}

2: {2, 3}

3: {3, 4}

4: {4, 5, 6}

5: {5, 6}

6: {6}

7: {}//empty, loop terminates

Output:

1

2

3

4

5

6

share|improve this answer
3  
The OP's code isn't wrong, surely? Writing when you enqueue results in the same order as writing when you dequeue, by definition. Of course your code is DRYer and (hence) better. – Steve Jessop Jul 9 '09 at 15:59
    
Yes you're right, the OP code works. I thought I saw an error that wasn't actually there. It's still more proper to only process the node in one place. I've removed my assertion that the OP code was incorrect. – CodeFusionMobile Jul 9 '09 at 16:18

Since the question requires printing the tree level by level, there should be a way to determine when to print the new line character on the console. Here's my code which tries to do the same by appending NewLine node to the queue,

void PrintByLevel(Node *root)
{
   Queue q;
   Node *newline = new Node("\n");
   Node *v;
   q->enque(root);
   q->enque(newline);

   while(!q->empty()) {
      v = q->deque();
      if(v == newline) {
         printf("\n");
         if(!q->empty())
            q->enque(newline);
      }
      else {
         printf("%s", v->val);
         if(v->Left)
            q-enque(v->left);
         if(v->right)
            q->enque(v->right);
      }
   }
   delete newline;
}
share|improve this answer

Let's see some Scala solutions. First, I'll define a very basic binary tree:

case class Tree[+T](value: T, left: Option[Tree[T]], right: Option[Tree[T]])

We'll use the following tree:

    1
   / \
  2   3
 /   / \
4   5   6

You define the tree like this:

val myTree = Tree(1, 
                  Some(Tree(2, 
                            Some(Tree(4, None, None)), 
                            None
                       )
                  ),
                  Some(Tree(3,
                            Some(Tree(5, None, None)),
                            Some(Tree(6, None, None))
                       )
                  )
             )

We'll define a breadthFirst function which will traverse the tree applying the desired function to each element. With this, we'll define a print function and use it like this:

def printTree(tree: Tree[Any]) = 
  breadthFirst(tree, (t: Tree[Any]) => println(t.value))

printTree(myTree)

Now, Scala solution, recursive, lists but no queues:

def breadthFirst[T](t: Tree[T], f: Tree[T] => Unit): Unit = {
  def traverse(trees: List[Tree[T]]): Unit = trees match {
    case Nil => // do nothing
    case _ =>
      val children = for{tree <- trees
                         Some(child) <- List(tree.left, tree.right)} 
                         yield child
      trees map f
      traverse(children)
  }

  traverse(List(t))
}

Next, Scala solution, queue, no recursion:

def breadthFirst[T](t: Tree[T], f: Tree[T] => Unit): Unit = {
  import scala.collection.mutable.Queue
  val queue = new Queue[Option[Tree[T]]]
  import queue._

  enqueue(Some(t))

  while(!isEmpty) 
    dequeue match {
      case Some(tree) => 
        f(tree)
        enqueue(tree.left)
        enqueue(tree.right)
      case None =>
    }
}

That recursive solution is fully functional, though I have an uneasy feeling that it can be further simplified.

The queue version is not functional, but it is highly effective. The bit about importing an object is unusual in Scala, but put to good use here.

share|improve this answer

In order to print out by level, you can store the level information with the node as a tuple to add to the queue. Then you can print a new line whenever the level is changed. Here is a Python code to do so.

from collections import deque
class BTreeNode:
    def __init__(self, data, left=None, right=None):
        self.data = data
        self.left = left
        self.right = right

    def printLevel(self):
        """ Breadth-first traversal, print out the data by level """
        level = 0
        lastPrintedLevel = 0
        visit = deque([])
        visit.append((self, level))
        while len(visit) != 0:
            item = visit.popleft()
            if item[1] != lastPrintedLevel:  #New line for a new level
                lastPrintedLevel +=1
                print
            print item[0].data,
            if item[0].left != None:
                visit.append((item[0].left, item[1] + 1))
            if item[0].right != None: 
                visit.append((item[0].right, item[1] + 1))
share|improve this answer
public class LevelOrderTraversalQueue {     

    Queue<Nodes> qe = new LinkedList<Nodes>();

    public void printLevelOrder(Nodes root)     
    { 
        if(root == null) return;

        qe.add(root);
        int count = qe.size();

        while(count!=0)
        {   
            System.out.print(qe.peek().getValue());
            System.out.print("  ");
            if(qe.peek().getLeft()!=null) qe.add(qe.peek().getLeft());
            if(qe.peek().getRight()!=null) qe.add(qe.peek().getRight());
            qe.remove(); count = count -1;
            if(count == 0 )
            {
                System.out.println("  ");
                count = qe.size();
            }
        }           
    }

}
share|improve this answer

I tweaked the answer so that it shows the null nodes and prints it by height. Was actually fairly decent for testing the balance of a red black tree. can
also add the color into the print line to check black height.

    Queue<node> q = new Queue<node>();
    int[] arr = new int[]{1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256};
    int i =0;
    int b = 0;
    int keeper = 0;
    public void BFS()
    {


        q.Enqueue(root);
        while (q.Count > 0)
        {

            node n = q.Dequeue();

            if (i == arr[b])
            {

                System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write("\r\n"+"("+n.id+")"); 
                b++;
                i =0 ;
            }
            else {

                System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write("(" + n.id + ")"); 

            }
            i++; 


            if (n.id != -1)
            {



                if (n.left != null)
                {

                    q.Enqueue(n.left);
                }
                else
                {
                    node c = new node();
                    c.id = -1;
                    c.color = 'b';
                    q.Enqueue(c);
                }

                if (n.right != null)
                {

                    q.Enqueue(n.right);
                }
                else
                {
                    node c = new node();
                    c.id = -1;
                    c.color = 'b';
                    q.Enqueue(c);

                }
            }

        }
        i = 0;
        b = 0;
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write("\r\n");
    }
share|improve this answer

Try this one (Complete code) :

class HisTree
{
    public static class HisNode
    {
        private int data;
        private HisNode left;
        private HisNode right;

        public HisNode() {}
        public HisNode(int _data , HisNode _left , HisNode _right)
        {
            data = _data;
            right = _right;
            left = _left;
        }
        public HisNode(int _data)
        {
            data = _data;
        }
    }

    public static int height(HisNode root)
    {
        if (root == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        else
        {
            return 1 + Math.max(height(root.left), height(root.right));
        }
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
//          1
//         /  \ 
//        /    \
//       2      3
//      / \    / \  
//     4    5 6   7
//    /
//   21

        HisNode root1 = new HisNode(3 , new HisNode(6) , new HisNode(7));
        HisNode root3 = new HisNode(4 , new HisNode(21) , null);
        HisNode root2 = new HisNode(2 , root3 , new HisNode(5));
        HisNode root = new HisNode(1 , root2 , root1);
        printByLevels(root);
    }


    private static void printByLevels(HisNode root) {

        List<HisNode> nodes = Arrays.asList(root);
        printByLevels(nodes);

    }

    private static void printByLevels(List<HisNode> nodes)
    {
        if (nodes == null || (nodes != null && nodes.size() <= 0))
        {
            return;
        }
        List <HisNode> nodeList = new LinkedList<HisNode>();
        for (HisNode node : nodes)
        {
            if (node != null)
            {
                System.out.print(node.data);
                System.out.print(" , ");
                nodeList.add(node.left);
                nodeList.add(node.right);
            }
        }
        System.out.println();
        if (nodeList != null && !CheckIfNull(nodeList))
        {
            printByLevels(nodeList);    
        }
        else
        {
            return;
        }

    }


    private static boolean CheckIfNull(List<HisNode> list)
    {
        for(HisNode elem : list)
        {
            if (elem != null)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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