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How can I break a long one liner string in my code and keep the string indented with the rest of the code? PEP 8 doesn't have any example for this case.

Correct ouptut but strangely indented:

if True:
    print "long test long test long test long test long \
test long test long test long test long test long test"

>>> long test long test long test long test long test long test long test long test long test long test

Bad output, but looks better in code:

if True:
    print "long test long test long test long test long \
    test long test long test long test long test long test"

>>> long test long test long test long test long     test long test long test long test long test long test


Wow, lots of fast answers. Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
if True:
    print "long test long test long test long test long"\
    "test long test long test long test long test long test"
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3  
Here's the reference: docs.python.org/reference/… –  S.Lott Jul 9 '09 at 17:27

Adjacent strings are concatenated at compile time:

if True:
    print ("this is the first line of a very long string"
           " this is the second line")

Output:

this is the first line of a very long string this is the second line
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Why is this significantly more up voted? –  JcMaco Jul 9 '09 at 19:00
1  
Most likely because it has more information than the current accepted answer, and because it's more 'Pythonic' (quoth PEP 8: "The preferred way of wrapping long lines is by using Python's implied line continuation inside parentheses, brackets and braces"). There might be some personal preference involved as well, but, as the answer's author, I can't comment on that. –  Noah Medling Jul 9 '09 at 19:19
    
@Noah, I can't agree with you any more. I think the only reason for it has been accepted is the concordance between it's last line's indention with @JcMaco's original post. It's trivial and is NOT convincing. In fact, I prefer the PEP 8 style too. sorry for didn't add any supplementary information last night for I must go to bed at that moment and ... my broken English. –  sunqiang Jul 9 '09 at 22:26
    
+1 for being pythonic... this ought to be the accepted answer :-). Maybe you'll get a badge for exceeding the accepted answer though :-). –  Tom Jul 10 '09 at 5:47
1  
@Scott Griffiths: I don't think your example is very successful. print ("Hello", "world") is not the same as print "Hello", "world", but print "Hello" "world" is exactly the same as print ("Hello" "world"). Please note lack of comma operator. –  tzot Jul 12 '09 at 22:18

You can use a trailing backslash to join separate strings like this:

if True:
    print "long test long test long test long test long " \
          "test long test long test long test long test long test"
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Why isn't anyone recommending triple quotes?

print """ blah blah
          blah .............."""
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2  
Because it leaves a gigantic space between the 2nd and 3rd blah without the special formatting that you need. –  Unknown Jul 10 '09 at 5:38
    
Also because the parenthesis idea generalizes to other things... for example, lots of arguments to a function, or long math formulas. Parenthesis are more pythonic. –  Tom Jul 10 '09 at 5:45
    
See examples here in the Google pythons style guide: code.google.com/p/soc/wiki/PythonStyleGuide#Line_length –  Tom Jul 10 '09 at 5:48
if True:
   print "long test long test long test "+
   "long test long test long test "+
   "long test long test long test "

And so on.

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8  
This code has syntax errors -- you need to add ( ) or \ like other answers did, and the + signs are superfluous. –  Alex Martelli Jul 9 '09 at 15:54
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Bakuriu Nov 15 '12 at 21:30

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