Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a small utility class :

public static class SerializationUtilities
{
    public static string ToXml<T>(T @object)
    {
        Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(@object != null);
        Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(typeof(T).IsSerializable);
        Contract.Ensures(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Contract.Result<string>()));

        var xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        var result = new StringBuilder();

        using (var sw = new StringWriter(result))
        {
            xs.Serialize(sw, @object);
        }
        return result.ToString();
    }

    public static T FromXml<T>(string xml)
    {
        Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(xml));
        Contract.Ensures(!object.Equals(Contract.Result<T>(), default(T)));

        var xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        using (var sr = new StringReader(xml))
        {
            return (T)xs.Deserialize(sr);
        }
    }
}

The two methods are working as expected.

However, the code contract static checker is throwing two warnings :

Warning 30 CodeContracts: ensures unproven: !string.IsNullOrEmpty(Contract.Result())

Warning 28 CodeContracts: ensures unproven: !object.Equals(Contract.Result(), default(T))

Why are these warning emitted ? What is the correct (best?) way to contractualize my methods ?

share|improve this question
2  
Your Ensures can't be so strict. Most of framework methods aren't decorated with contracts. You can't be sure that StringBuilder.ToString() won't return an empty string because there is not information about what XmlSerializer.Serialize will do. Same for deserializing: no informations to assert that XmlSerializer.Deserialize won't return a default(T) object. –  Adriano Repetti Jun 15 '12 at 9:10
    
+1 for Adriano. You could at most do the Ensure that the result string is not null, then you can return an empty string. Or you could check if the StringBuilder() returned empty and then handle it appropriately. Same for the second method. –  Patryk Ćwiek Jun 15 '12 at 9:13
    
I just realize that if I have a value type serialized, it can have a default value. For example, if I serialize "0", my contract will fail, even if 0 can be the correct value. –  Steve B Jun 15 '12 at 9:14
    
@Adriano: answer to the question instead of commenting. You are actually answering it here. –  Steve B Jun 15 '12 at 9:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your Contract.Ensures() can't be so strict.

Most of framework methods aren't decorated with contracts. You can't be sure that StringBuilder.ToString() won't return an empty string because there is not information about what XmlSerializer.Serialize() will do. Same for deserializing: no informations to assert that XmlSerializer.Deserialize() won't return a default(T) object.

As pointed out by @TrustMe-ImADoctor in the comment you may have to add additional checks in your code for that assertion, static analysis will then see that the case is handled and impossible. I guess you do not need to pollute your code with more checks, for this interop cases you may just use Contract.Assume().

share|improve this answer
2  
In fact, I think my approach is wrong. If the data is not correct, the serializer will fail to deserialize and throw an exception. That's ok and enough I think. So I'll simply wipe out my Ensures and keep my requires. –  Steve B Jun 15 '12 at 9:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.