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I have an JPanel populated with several opaque custom components. Now I would like to draw something on top of these components by overriding the paintComponent() method. My problem is that the painted stuff is placed behind the embedded components and, as they are opaque, is covered by them.

Is there any way to let the painting appear on top of the components?

Here's a short example of what I'm trying to do:

public class DrawOnTop {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                JFrame f = new JFrame("Draw on top");
                f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                f.add(new MyPanel());
                f.pack();
                f.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}

class MyPanel extends JPanel {

    public MyPanel() {
        setLayout(new BorderLayout(3, 3));
        add(new JButton("Button 1"), BorderLayout.NORTH);
        add(new JButton("Button 2"), BorderLayout.CENTER);
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        super.paintComponent(g);
        g.setColor(Color.red);
        g.drawLine(0, 0, getVisibleRect().width, getVisibleRect().height);
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You were thinking along the right lines. Only problem was that you should have Overridden the paintChildren() method like in the code below. This is because the paintComponent() method is called as first and does the background etc painting of the component itself (the MyPanel), then is called paintBorders() and lastly the paintChildren() which paints all that is inside of the component calling it.

public class DrawOnTop {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                JFrame f = new JFrame("Draw on top");
                f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                f.add(new MyPanel());
                f.pack();
                f.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}

class MyPanel extends JPanel {

    public MyPanel() {
        setLayout(new BorderLayout(3, 3));
        JButton b1 = new JButton("Button 1");
        MouseListener ml = new MouseAdapter() {

            @Override
            public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e) {
                super.mouseExited(e);
                MyPanel.this.repaint();
            }
        };
        b1.addMouseListener(ml);
        JButton b2 = new JButton("Button 2");
        b2.addMouseListener(ml);
        add(b1, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        add(b2, BorderLayout.CENTER);
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintChildren(Graphics g) {
        super.paintChildren(g);
        g.setColor(Color.red);
        g.drawLine(0, 0, getVisibleRect().width, getVisibleRect().height);
    }
}

Important to notice, in the code sample, that I added also a MouseListener to repaint the panel when a mouse exits a button, otherwise the buttons would always stay over the line once mouse enters over one of them.

But if you want to have a custom painting that is always on top of your components then I would suggest to use a glass pane. Examples of a glass pane use are provided here:

  1. Simple one.
  2. A more complex one.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for. I've read at several places that custom painting should always take place in paintComponent(). Also many thanks for the suggestion to use a glass pane. I will see if this is necessary. –  Moritz Jun 15 '12 at 12:37
1  
@Moritz Yea I know what you are referring to. I agree the paintComponent() should be used for custom painting that doesn't have any relation to its content. This is not true in our case. In our case the panel contains children which are always going to show on top of it as they are painted after their parent finishes. For this simple reason in order to paint 'over' children we must call it in paintChildren() method. –  Boro Jun 15 '12 at 13:13

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