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I've got a long list containing different numbers of elements which also can recur in the same field.
This is an example of the first five lines:

A <- list(c("JAMES","CHARLES","JAMES","RICHARD"),  
          c("JOHN","ROBERT","CHARLES"),  
          c("CHARLES","WILLIAM","CHARLES","MICHAEL","WILLIAM","DAVID","CHARLES","WILLIAM"),  
          c("CHARLES"),  
          c("CHARLES","CHARLES"))  

Now I'd like to calculate the number of elements for each line of the list.
My desired output would look similar to this:

[1] 4  
[2] 3  
[3] 7  
[4] 1  
[5] 2  

In addition to that I'd like to know the frequency the term "CHARLES" occurs in each line.
Based on my example I'd like to get an output similar to this:

[1] 1  
[2] 1  
[3] 3  
[4] 1  
[5] 2  

I thought of this:

> table(A)  
Error in table(A) : all arguments arguments must have same length  
> sum(A)  
Error in sum(A) : invalid 'type' (list) of argument  

But I don't know what to do about these error messages and am not aware of alternatives, unfortunately.
I know that the number of lines of the list is:

> length(A)  
[1] 5  

But this doesn't answer my question, unfortunately. I couldn't find any other answers, either.
Therefore I'd like to ask you to please help me calculate these two measures!

Thank you very much in advance!

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should get familiar with lapply and sapply to loop over lists:

sapply(A, length)
[1] 4 3 8 1 2

sapply(A, function(x)sum(grepl("CHARLES", x)))
[1] 1 1 3 1 2

What grepl() does is to match a regular expression to your text, and returns TRUE or FALSE depending on whether there is a match. I then do a sum() over these logical values, i.e. summing the TRUE values.

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1  
Thank you very much for this concise and helpful reply! –  user0815 Jun 16 '12 at 9:14
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sapply(A, function(x) length(x))
[1] 4 3 8 1 2
un <- unique(unlist(A))
nm <- lapply(un, function(x) sapply(A, function(y) sum(y == x)))
names(nm) <- un
nm
$JAMES
[1] 2 0 0 0 0

$CHARLES
[1] 1 1 3 1 2

$RICHARD
[1] 1 0 0 0 0

$JOHN
[1] 0 1 0 0 0

$ROBERT
[1] 0 1 0 0 0

$WILLIAM
[1] 0 0 3 0 0

$MICHAEL
[1] 0 0 1 0 0

$DAVID
[1] 0 0 1 0 0
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Thank you very much, this is also very helpful! –  user0815 Jun 16 '12 at 9:14
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For calculating the length of the elements of list A.You can use the following command :

list.len <- lapply(1:length(A),function(x) length(A[[x]]))
unlist(list.len)
[1] 4  
[2] 3  
[3] 7  
[4] 1  
[5] 2  

for calculating the number of times "CHARLES" appear in each element of the list you can do the following :

len.name <- lapply(1:length(A),function(x) length(which(A[[x]] == "CHARLES")))
len.name
[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 1

[[3]]
[1] 3

[[4]]
[1] 1

[[5]]
[1] 2

then you can unlist

unlist(len.name)

and then you will get the output to be :

[1] 1  
[2] 1  
[3] 3  
[4] 1  
[5] 2  
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1  
Nice. Rather than using unlist, I suggest you use sapply, which returns a simplified version of lapply. –  Andrie Jun 15 '12 at 11:01
    
Thank you very much for your helpful solution! –  user0815 Jun 16 '12 at 9:15
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