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i have a coordinate system with fixed width

#define gridSize 101
int _map[gridSize][gridSize];

Since i get values for certain x y coordinates ranging from -50 to 50 i would like to call my map with for example map[0][0] as origin of ordinates pointing to _map[51][51]. In other words, if i get a value for x y from my source and want to add it to my map i would like to call

map[x][y] = value

And what actually gets the value is

_map[51+x][51+y] = value

So i have to create a pointer, but i am not sure how to do that in a multidimensional array.

#define gridSize 101 // must be an odd number for origin of ordinates in center
#define gridSizeCenter = (int)(gridSize/2)+1;
int _map[gridSize][gridSize];
int map[gridSize][gridSize];
map = &_map[gridSizeCenter][gridSizeCenter]; // wont work

The last line of code is wrong. How do I do it right?

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3  
Common practise is for #defines to be in uppercase, e.g. #define GRIDSIZE. Otherwise they look like variables. –  user82238 Jun 15 '12 at 9:59

3 Answers 3

Yes, you can!

I don't think you can do this with arrays, but you can do it with pointers to array elements.

However, I would not do this unless I had a VERY good reason. Negatively indexable pointers aren't going to be what someone reading your code will expect, and so it will be easy to accidentally misuse. For clarity, you may be better off with a function-based solution - unless it needs to be VERY fast.

With that out of the way, let's do it!

From your attempt, it looks like you might be confused about arrays and pointers. Remember, they are not the same thing.

Now, C doesn't prevent you from using negative indexes, which can make sense when you're using a pointer. So, you can do this:

 int a[5]; 
 int *b = a + 2; // or &a[2] 

 b[-2] // is a[0]
 b[-1] // is a[1]
 b[0]  // ia a[2], etc 

So, I think the following code will work for you.

#define GRIDSIZE 101

.....


int map_memory[GRIDSIZE][GRIDSIZE];
int *map_rows[GRIDSIZE];
int **map;   
int i;

int gridMidPoint = GRIDSIZE / 2;

for(i = 0; i < GRIDSIZE; i++) {
    map_rows[i] = &(map_memory[i][0]) + gridMidPoint;
}
map = map_rows + gridMidPoint;

Then you can use it exactly as you'd expect - with the grid size of 101:

for(i = -50; i <= 50; i++) {
    for(j = -50; j <= 50; j++) {
        map[i][j] = i+j;
    }
}

Or, more generally:

for(i = -1 * gridMidPoint; i <= gridMidPoint; i++) {
    for(j = -1 * gridMidPoint; j <= gridMidPoint; j++) {
        map[i][j] = i+j;
    }
}

Since both arrays are created on the stack, there's no need to free anything.


What's happening here? Let me break it down. First, we create the backing array:

int map_memory[GRIDSIZE][GRIDSIZE]; 

Next, we want an array of pointers that we're going to use to be our rows:

int *map_rows[GRIDSIZE];

We need these to be pointers, because they're going to point into the middle of the arrays in the two dimensional array we just made.

int gridMidPoint = GRIDSIZE / 2;

Here we calculate the midpoint. I'm assuming that you want the same number of array elements on each side of the zero - so you don't need the +1 from your example.

for(i = 0; i < GRIDSIZE; i++) {
    map_rows[i] = &(map_memory[i][0]) + gridMidPoint;
}

This code iterates over each element in our rows array, and sets that row to point into the middle of the relevant row in the two dimensional array. You could also write:

    map_rows[i] = &map_memory[i][gridMidPoint];

But I personally believe that the version with the superflous brackets and the addition is clearer to read. I think if you're doing unusual things with pointers, you should spell out exactly what's happening for the next guy who reads your code.

Finally, we need our map pointer to point in to the middle of the rows:

map = map_rows + gridMidPoint;

And we're done!


Remember that two dimensional arrays are actually one block of contiguous memory. This means that map[0][gridMidPoint+1] is the same location as map[1][-1*gridMidPoint]. This is actually no different to a normal two dimensional array, but it's something to be aware of when debugging.

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You can't do it that way. The best solution is probably to have a set of functions that accesses the _map variable. Something like:

void set_map_value(int map[][gridSize], const int value, const int x, const int y)
{
    map[x + 51][y + 51] = value;
}

int get_map_value(int map[][gridSize], const int x, const int y)
{
    return map[x + 51][y + 51];
}

Using functions gives you type checking, and also allows you to range-check the coordinates.


One reason you can't do it like you want, and the reason of your compilation errors, is that the types are incompatible.

Another reason is that you really can't have negative indexes in arrays. Remember that the integer -1 is the same as 0xffffffff, i.e. 4294967295 which is a large number way out of the array range.

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2  
I don't believe the C standard requires unsigned integers in array/pointer subscripting, so I think your comment about unsigned representations of signed values is misleading. –  Timothy Jones Jun 15 '12 at 14:26

you can use this solution

#define gridSize 101 // must be an odd number for origin of ordinates in center
#define gridSizeCenter gridSize/2 +1

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {

    int _map[gridSize][gridSize];
#define MAP(A,B) _map[A+gridSizeCenter][B+gridSizeCenter]
    MAP(-1,-1) = 5;
    MAP(0,0) = 6;
    printf ("MAP(0,0) = %d\r\nMAP(-1,-1) = %d\r\n",MAP(0,0),MAP(-1,-1));
    return 0;
}
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