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Sometimes when looking at optimised code, I see that parameters that are used only within the scope of a loop have their declaration moved outside of the loop.

Something like this:

A arr[BIG_NUMBER];

// .... //

for (int i=0; i!=BIG_NUMBER; ++i)
{
    B b = arr[i].getB();
    // ... do some work with b.
}

being turned into this:

A arr[BIG_NUMBER];

// .... //

B b;
for (int i=0; i!=BIG_NUMBER; ++i)
{
    b = arr[i].getB();
    // ... do some work with b.
}

Presumably the reasoning is that we're saving on continually redeclaring b. But is this a reasonable thing to do? And is the answer different depending on whether B is a primitive type or a class?

I would have thought that whilst the scope limitations of the variables within the for loop may prevent them from being accessed outside the loop, as the loop's contents exists within the same stack frame, the 'actual' declaration only happens once.

(NB, I've considered Creating an object in the loop but consider this to be a different question as it is about any costs associated with declaration rather than initialisation.)

EDIT - improved title

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1  
@JoachimPileborg it does matter if the constructor/destructor is expensive. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 15 '12 at 11:15
    
The compiler could also elect to adjust the stack pointer on block entry/exit (don't remember if it is even possible to ask g++ to do it, by default it does not), though the cost would be trivial in comparison to the loop construct. –  Matthieu M. Jun 15 '12 at 11:32
    
Note: the extra scoping can be offset by wrapping everything up in another pair of curly braces. { B b; for (...) { } } is an acceptable construct, generally seen for RAII constructs. –  Matthieu M. Jun 15 '12 at 11:34
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If it's a primitive type, the compiler will optimize accordingly.

If it's a user-defined class, it depends. What's more expensive, one extra initialization or BIG_NUMBER destructors?

Compare these:

B b;  //one initialization
for (int i=0; i!=BIG_NUMBER; ++i)
{
    b = arr[i].getB();  //BIG_NUMBER assignments
}

for (int i=0; i!=BIG_NUMBER; ++i)
{
    B b = arr[i].getB();  //BIG_NUMBER initializations 
                          //should be the same as an assignment
} //BIG_NUMBER objects destroyed
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1  
And the time when it makes a difference is when the object holds some expensive-to-construct resource, that is unaffected by assignment (so you should initialize outside the loop). Or when getB returns by value and you get a copy elision that of course is impossible with the assignment (so you should initialize inside the loop, or swap instead of assigning). Move semantics mostly mitigate the latter. –  Steve Jessop Jun 15 '12 at 11:19
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There's no general answer. It depends on the type of B, the compiler you're using, and possibly what you're doing in the loop (after the assignment). All you can do is measure, and even that will only tell you about one particular compiler, running on one particular machine.

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