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Consider the following scenario:

/**
 * A sample interface.
 */
public interface MyInterface
{
}

/**
 * First sample implementation of the above interface.
 */
public class MyClass1 implements MyInterface
{
    public String toString()
    {
        return "[ My Class 1 ]";
    }
}


/**
 * Second sample implementation of the above interface.
 */
public class MyClass2 implements MyInterface
{
    public String toString()
    {
        return "[ My Class 2 ]";
    }
}


import java.util.Collection;

/**
 * A service interface that declares a generic method
 * returning a collection of subtype the interface defined above.
 */
public interface MyService
{
    public <T> extends MyInterface<Collection<T>> myMethod();

}

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collection;

/**
 * The implementation of the service interface 
 * that returns the generic type. 
 */
public class MyServiceImpl implements MyService
{

    @Override
    public Collection<MyInterface> myMethod()
    {
        return Arrays.asList(new MyClass1(), new MyClass2());
    }

}

import java.util.Collection;

/**
 * Simple main class to drive the point 
 * I would like raise in the query below.
 */
public class MyMain
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        MyService service = new MyServiceImpl();
        Collection<MyClass1> list = service.myMethod();
        // This works at runtime.
        System.out.println(list);
        for (MyClass1 obj : list)
        {
            // This throws ClassCastException at runtime.
            System.out.println(obj);
        }
    }
}

In the above code, how can Java generics implementation allow the MyServiceImpl's implementation to return a generic class when the MyService declaration talks about a specific subtype of a given type?

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This doesn't compile as list has no generic type. Collection list = service.myMethod(); ... for (MyClass1 obj : list) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 15 '12 at 12:23
    
What generics? There are no generics in this code. What's your question? –  EJP Jun 15 '12 at 12:46
    
Oops, my template parameters are misunderstood as HTML tags. I shall try to edit the question. –  Vikdor Jun 15 '12 at 13:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I add the correct generic types

public class MyMain {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyService service = new MyServiceImpl();
        Collection<MyInterface> list = service.myMethod();
        // This works at runtime.
        System.out.println(list);
        for (MyInterface obj : list) {
            // This doesn't throw a ClassCastException
            System.out.println(obj);
        }
    }
}

I get

[[ My Class 1 ], [ My Class 2 ]]
[ My Class 1 ]
[ My Class 2 ]

I don't see how you can get your example to compile without warning and trigger a ClassCastException.

share|improve this answer
    
I compiled with JDK 1.6 and didn't get any unchecked warnings (which is the intriguing part). Your addition of generic types is not what I intended. Could you please take another look at my code block which I corrected just now? thanks much for your response, btw. –  Vikdor Jun 15 '12 at 13:05
1  
I get Warning: Note: MyServiceImpl.java uses unchecked or unsafe operations. with Java 6 update 32 –  Peter Lawrey Jun 15 '12 at 13:24
    
Ah! Thanks. I don't get this warning in Eclipse even though all the items under Windows->Preferences->Java->Compiler->Errors/Warnings->Generic Types are set to "Warning" and that checkbox is unchecked. –  Vikdor Jun 18 '12 at 4:48
1  
Its worth nothing that Eclipse uses the IBM Compiler so its behaviour can be slightly different. On big example is that it calculates serialVersionUID differently. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 18 '12 at 8:41
System.out.println(list);

This line is ok because it just calls the method toString() for both elements which are cast to Object in the absence of a generic type.

for (MyClass1 obj : list)
{
   // This throws ClassCastException at runtime.
   System.out.println(obj);
}

But here you get a runtime ClassCastException because you are casting the MyClass2 element in the list to the class MyClass1 which is not a super-class of MyClass2. The for-loop needs to iterate over a common super-class or interface.

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