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I was going through an interview question in this site

http://javarevisited.blogspot.in/2011/04/top-20-core-java-interview-questions.html

and I was struck with this question:

What’s wrong using HashMap in multithreaded environment? When get() method go to infinite loop ?

According to my opinion, it's not a problem to use HashMap inside a multi-threaded environemnt, as long as our application is not creating threads which are modifying the created HashMap, rather than simply accessing the HashMap

So in my understanding, it's not a problem as long as in the application we are just accessing the HashMap in a multi-threaded environment?

Please let me know if my understanding is correct.

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I think you have a typo in your question. "as our application is creating threads which are modifying the created HashMap, rather than modifying the HashMap". I suspect the first "modifying" should be "accessing" or "reading". – Gray Jun 15 '12 at 12:51
    
Yes , thanks for pointing it out , our APplication doesn't create Threads explicitly . we just access the Data inside the HashMap . – Preethi Jain Jun 15 '12 at 12:57
up vote 9 down vote accepted

What’s wrong using HashMap in multithreaded environment? When get() method go to infinite loop ?

What is wrong is to have multiple threads use a non-synchronized collection (really any class) in an unprotected manner. Certain if each thread had their own HashMap instance then this is not an issue. It is a problem if multiple threads, for example, are adding to the same HashMap instance without it being synchronized.

If you need to use the same hash table object in multiple threads then you should consider using ConcurrentHashMap, wrapping each of the accesses to the HashMap in a synchronized {} block, or making use of the Collections.synchronizedMap(new HashMap<...>()) construct.

So in my understanding, it's not a problem as long as in the application we are just accessing the HashMap in a multi-threaded environment?

If by "accessing" you mean "reading", then this is true with qualifications. You must make sure:

  • All of the updates to the HashMap are completed before the threads are instantiated and the thread that creates the map also forks the threads
  • The threads are only using the HashMap in read-only mode (get() or iteration)
  • There are no other threads updating the map

If any of these conditions are not true then you will need to use a synchronized map instead.

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This is a classical question. ArrayList and HashMap are not synchronized, while Vector and HashTable are. You should therefore use HashTable unless you are very careful defining mutexes yourself.

In other words, the methods in e.g. HashTable will ensure that no other thread is working with the HashTable at any given time. If you use a HashMap, you'd have to do that manually by ensuring that you synchronize on HashMap before you call the method.

Update: checkout @Gray's comment. It looks like wrapping HashMap with Collections.synchronizedMap(new HashMap()) is the way to go now.

EDIT: other posters have answered way better than I did. My answer, however, generated an interesting discussion on the use of the soon to be deprecated Vector, Stack, Hashtable and Dictionary classes, so I'm leaving the question here, as a head to the comments below. Thanks guys!

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7  
HashTable is all but deprecated and should not be used. If you need a concurrent HashMap then you should use ConcurrentHashMap or Collections.synchronizedMap(new HashMap()). – Gray Jun 15 '12 at 12:24
    
@Gray Oh, that's interesting, I had no idea. Do you have a reference to that? With HashTable not being marked as deprecated, this came as a surprise. Thanks! – Miquel Jun 15 '12 at 12:27
    
@Gray And since we are at it, is vector also deprecated? – Miquel Jun 15 '12 at 12:29
    
@Gary Or use ConcurrentHashMap which can be safely iterated without a CME. – Peter Lawrey Jun 15 '12 at 12:29
1  
They are "deprecated" since the introduction of the Concurrent package, which introduces thread-safe collections with a finer granularity than Vector or HashTable (which achieve thread-safety through a kind of big-lock on the whole data structure). – akappa Jun 15 '12 at 12:38

I guess that they meant to access to a shared copy of HashMap. Shared mutable state.

Since it is not synchronized every thread will grab its copy from the main memory, modify, and overwrite it.

HashMap with one entry <n, 1>

thread 1 grab the copy

thread 2 grab the copy

thread 1 modify <n, 2>

thread 2 modify <n, 3>

thread 1 is done, and stores the copy in the main memory

now memory is <n, 2>

thread 2 is done and stores the copy

now memory is <n, 3>

The state thread 1 is lost
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