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Given a very large string. I would like to process parts of the string in a loop like this:

large_string = "foobar..."
while large_string:
    process(large_string.pop(200))

What is a nice and efficient way of doing this?

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4  
What exactly do you want? The first 200 characters? The 200th character? Something else? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 15 '12 at 12:28
1  
@KarlKnechtel Isn't the while loop clearly showing that I want to process all characters of the string? –  Martin Flucka Jun 15 '12 at 14:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can wrap the string in a StringIO or BytesIO and pretend it's a file. That should be pretty fast.

from cStringIO import StringIO
# or, in Py3/Py2.6+:
#from io import BytesIO, StringIO

s = StringIO(large_string)
while True:
    chunk = s.read(200)
    if len(chunk) > 0:
        process(chunk)
    if len(chunk) < 200:
        break
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2  
Beat me by 6 seconds. –  mgilson Jun 15 '12 at 12:30
    
If he want to consume the string from the end this does not work. –  schlamar Jun 15 '12 at 12:34
1  
@ms4py: true. In that case, I'd slice the string up into a list and iterate over it in reverse: [large_string[i:i+200] for i in xrange(0, len(large_string), 200)] –  larsmans Jun 15 '12 at 12:48
2  
@larsmans: Or, you could use the buffer's seek method to read the last n bytes: s.seek(-200, 2); chunk = s.read()... –  Joel Cornett Jun 15 '12 at 12:51
2  
You don't need Py3 for io.StringIO - it exists from 2.6. –  lvc Jun 15 '12 at 13:09

you can convert the string to a list. list(string) and pop it, or you could iterate in chunks slicing the list [] or you can slice the string as is and iterate in chunks

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You can do this with slicing:

large_string = "foobar..."
while large_string:
    process(large_string[-200:])
    large_string = large_string[:-200]
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2  
This is pretty wasteful. Not only because it does the slicing twice, but because it uses an O(n²) time algorithm. –  larsmans Jun 15 '12 at 12:32

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