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I have the task of (trying to) do a search and replace within a large codebase for a word suffix, only when it occurs within comments. All of the comments are of the /* or // type but they are guaranteed to include most of the edge cases imaginable.

So I want to change this:

/* blah blah something__suffix blah */

to this:

/* blah blah something blah */

but I also want to change this:

// blah blah something__suffix blah 

to this:

// blah blah something blah 

And this:

/*
 * blah blah something__suffix blah 
 */

to this:

/*
 * blah blah something blah 
 */

And this:

/** 

// blah blah something__suffix blah 

*/

To this:

/** 

// blah blah something blah 

*/

ad nauseam (literally).

Initially I felt that this was a parser task and I installed cochinelle, and indeed it could parse my comments but it got stuck with my preprocessor macros and the workarounds seemed complex for someone who just has this as a one-off task. So now I'm considering regex.

I haven't found a lot of advice around about doing really robust search and replace within C and C++ comments with regex (besides "you need a parser"), but I did notice that there seems to be a pretty well road-tested perl script on the perl FAQ for removing comments in both of these styles here.

as follows:

$/ = undef;
$_ = <>;

s#/\*[^*]*\*+([^/*][^*]*\*+)*/|//([^\\]|[^\n][\n]?)*?\n|("(\\.|[^"\\])*"|'(\\.|[^'\\])*'|.[^/"'\\]*)#defined $3 ? $3 : ""#gse;

print;

My question: how to adapt this script so that instead of stripping the comment, the text that has been identified as a comment can then be searched for the suffix and the suffix removed, leaving the rest of the comment intact?

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2  
related: replace string1 with string2, only in comments –  daxim Jun 15 '12 at 13:24
    
Note @daxim's link, the accepted answer there seems not to handle strings. So this expression is probably more robust. –  Qtax Jun 15 '12 at 13:27
    
That Regexp::Common is really great, didn't know it. Thanks daxim. –  simbabque Jun 15 '12 at 13:28
    
@Qtax Could you give an example of a string it doesn't handle? –  Halle Jun 15 '12 at 14:31
    
@Halle, x = "hello there /* oops this is not a comment */";. The "comment" inside the string will be matched. While this expression handles strings properly. –  Qtax Jun 15 '12 at 14:49
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to do it in two steps because you might have

/* foo__suffix bar__suffix */

First, extract the comment, then substitute any __suffix in the comment.

s{
   \G
   (?:(?!/[*/]).)*
   \K
   (   /[*] (?:(?![*]/).)* [*]/
   |   //   [^\n]*
   )
}{
   my $comment = $1;
   $comment =~ s/(?<=\w)__suffix//g;
   $comment
}xes;

Notes:

  • (?:(?!STRING).) is to (?:STRING) as [^CHAR] is to CHAR.

  • My solution will mess up if you have // or /* in a string literal.

  • If you're ok with removing instances of __suffix that aren't preceded by an identifier, you can remove the (?<=\w).

  • If you're using 5.14 or higher, you can simplify

    s{...}{
       my $comment = $1;
       $comment =~ s/(?<=\w)__suffix//g;
       $comment
    }xes;
    

    to

    s{...}{
       $1 =~ s/(?<=\w)__suffix//rg
    }xes;
    
share|improve this answer
    
"My solution will mess up if you have // or /* in a string literal." That seems kind of probable in this case unfortunately. –  Halle Jun 15 '12 at 17:05
    
Really? Well, changing (?:(?!/[*/]).)* to (?: (?!/[*]|//|"). | "(?:[^"\\]|\\.)*" )* would probably handle it well enough. –  ikegami Jun 15 '12 at 17:29
    
"Kind of probable" may be an overstatement, but "every time I've said that a weird case was unlikely to occur in this code I've had reason to regret it" isn't one :) . Thanks for the update! –  Halle Jun 15 '12 at 22:56
    
This appears to have worked quite well, thank you. –  Halle Jun 16 '12 at 16:29
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I'm not sure if this is a good solution, but it works.

use strict; use warnings; use feature qw(say);
my @lines = (
qq~Example 1:
/* blah blah something__suffix blah */~,
qq~Example 2:
// blah blah something__suffix blah needs a newline at the end
~,
qq~Example 3:
/*
 * blah blah something__suffix blah 
 */~,
qq~Example 4:
/** 

// blah blah something__suffix blah 

*/~,
qq~Example 5 (string):
foobar '// blah blah something__suffix blah '~,
qq~Example 6:
public void main { return; } // this does__suffix nothing but needs newline
~,
);

foreach (@lines) {
  print "Before:\n$_\n";
  s!/\*[^*]*\*+([^/*][^*]*\*+)*/|//([^\\]|[^\n][\n]?)*?\n|("(\\.|[^"\\])*"|'(\\.|[^'\\])*'|.[^/"'\\]*)!
  { if (defined $3) { $3 } else { (my $temp = ${^MATCH}) =~ s/__suffix//; $temp;} } 
  !gsepx;

  print "After:\n$_\n\n";
}

It's probably not very efficient, but I don't think that is important for your job.

share|improve this answer
1  
Using $& with this expression is wrong, as it matches more than just comments. –  Qtax Jun 15 '12 at 13:29
    
I didn't try to understand the expression, I just changed the substitution part. I guess you're referring to where the original said #defined $3 ? $3 : ""#. I'll have a look. Thanks. –  simbabque Jun 15 '12 at 13:31
    
Where is the use of $&? Yes, definitely no need for efficiency here. –  Halle Jun 15 '12 at 13:55
    
$& is the same as ${^MATCH}. The problem was that the regex also matches comments that are inside of quotation. I just changed that and updated the example. It should work now. Thanks for the tip, Qtax. –  simbabque Jun 15 '12 at 13:58
    
$& and ${^MATCH} are not the same, although they are similar. –  ikegami Jun 15 '12 at 15:54
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