Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing a vector for exercise.
I want to do the following: I initially allocate 100 elements without calling it's constructors.Whenever an object is added to the vector, I call it's constructor until the vector is too large so that can't contain all objects.When the vector is full I allocate other 100 objects, and so on.
This is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <exception>
#include <cstdarg>

using namespace std;

class indexOutOfBounds:exception
{
    const virtual char* what()
    {
        return "Index out of bounds";
    }
};

template <class T>
class Vector
{
private:
    T* data;
    allocator<T> data_all;
    int length;
    int _size;
public:
    static const int block=100; // the size of a single allocation block
    Vector()
    {
        data=data_all.allocate(block,NULL);
        length=0;
        _size=block;
    }
    Vector(int n,...)
    {
        va_list vl;
        T temp;
        va_start(vl, n);
        for(int i=0; i<n;i++)
        {
            temp=va_arg(vl,T);
            push_back(temp);
        }
        va_end(vl);
    }
    int size() const
    {
        return length;
    }
    void push_back(T item)
    {
        length++;
        if(length==_size)
        {
            _size+=block;
            data=data_all.allocate(_size,data);
        }
        data_all.construct(&data[length-1],item);
    }
    T& operator[] (int i) throw()
    {
        if(i<0 || i>=length)
            throw indexOutOfBounds();
        return data[i];
    }
    ~Vector()
    {
        for(int i=0; i<length;i++)
        {
            data_all.destroy(&data[i]);
        }
        data_all.deallocate(data,_size);
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Vector<int> v(1,0);
    cout << v[0] << endl;
    return 0;
}

I get the exception when i try to print v[0]:
EXC_BAD_ACCESS(code=1, address= 0x0)
Maybe &v[0] is NULL, but I can't figure the reason.If I don't use the constructor with va_list and I just write a main like this:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Vector<int> v;
    v.push_back(1);
    cout << v[0] << endl;
    return 0;
}

I don't get any exception.Can someone explain why?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The most probable reason is that in the constructor with variable arguments, you do not initialize length or _size. This means that those values might be anything when you call push_back.

If you would have run your application in a debugger, and examined those variables, it would have been obvious. I recommend that next time you have a crash of some sort, run it in a debugger and try to figure it out first, before asking here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Vector(int n,...) constructor doesn't allocate memory. doesn't initialize length, _size. Then you immediately call push_back() from Vector(int n,...) constructor. When it calls push_back, the check if(length==_size) will not work as intended as both have junk values in it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.