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I stumbled over some code that appears to be correct. It is supposed to provide a public, immutable pointer, while keeping the modifiable non-const pointer private.

Strangely enough, this code broke on SN C++ Compiler (for PlayStation 3), but worked fine on GCC. On SN C++, data would point to bogus values, while m_data would work as intended.

Code in question:

#include <cstdint>

class Foo
{
   public:
      Foo() : data((const std::uint8_t* const&)m_data)
      {
         m_data = nullptr; // Set later in some other member function.
      }

      const std::uint8_t* const &data;

   private:
      std::uint8_t* m_data; 
};

Does this code invoke undefined behavior? As far as I know, casting to a reference like that will convert (const std::uint8_t* const&)m_data into *reinterpret_cast<const std::uint8_t* const*>(&m_data).

Test cases:

Foo* new_foo() { return new Foo; }

and looking at the generated disassembly. Note that it is PowerPC 64-bit with 32-bit longs and pointers.

SN C++: ps3ppusnc -o test-sn.o -O3 -c test.cpp

0000000000000000 <._Z7new_foov>:
   0:   f8 21 ff 81     stdu    r1,-128(r1)     # ffffff80
   4:   7c 08 02 a6     mflr    r0
   8:   f8 01 00 90     std     r0,144(r1)      # 90
   c:   fb e1 00 78     std     r31,120(r1)     # 78
  10:   38 60 00 08     li      r3,8
  14:   3b e0 00 00     li      r31,0
  18:   48 00 00 01     bl      18 <._Z7new_foov+0x18>
  1c:   60 00 00 00     nop
  20:   2c 03 00 00     cmpwi   r3,0
  24:   41 82 00 38     beq     5c <._Z7new_foov+0x5c>
  28:   30 81 00 70     addic   r4,r1,112       # 70
  2c:   93 e3 00 04     stw     r31,4(r3) <-- Set m_data to r31 (0).
  30:   60 7f 00 00     ori     r31,r3,0
  34:   90 83 00 00     stw     r4,0(r3)  <-- Set data to r4 (r1 + 112 (On stack)?!)
  38:   63 e3 00 00     ori     r3,r31,0
  3c:   e8 01 00 90     ld      r0,144(r1)      # 90
  40:   7c 08 03 a6     mtlr    r0
  44:   eb e1 00 78     ld      r31,120(r1)     # 78
  48:   38 21 00 80     addi    r1,r1,128       # 80
  4c:   4e 80 00 20     blr

GCC 4.1.1: ppu-lv2-g++ -o test-gcc.o -O3 -c test.cpp

0000000000000000 <._Z7new_foov>:
   0:   38 60 00 08     li      r3,8
   4:   7c 08 02 a6     mflr    r0
   8:   f8 21 ff 91     stdu    r1,-112(r1)     # ffffff90
   c:   f8 01 00 80     std     r0,128(r1)      # 80
  10:   48 00 00 01     bl      10 <._Z7new_foov+0x10>
  14:   60 00 00 00     nop
  18:   7c 69 1b 78     mr      r9,r3
  1c:   38 00 00 00     li      r0,0
  20:   39 63 00 04     addi    r11,r3,4 <-- Compute address of m_data
  24:   78 63 00 20     clrldi  r3,r3,32        # 20
  28:   90 09 00 04     stw     r0,4(r9) <-- Set m_data to r0 (0).
  2c:   e8 01 00 80     ld      r0,128(r1)      # 80
  30:   38 21 00 70     addi    r1,r1,112       # 70
  34:   91 69 00 00     stw     r11,0(r9) <-- Set data reference to m_data.
  38:   7c 08 03 a6     mtlr    r0
  3c:   4e 80 00 20     blr
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2  
What does "happened to break" mean? –  Rook Jun 15 '12 at 13:14
3  
You are using m_data in initialization of data, but at that point, m_data is still uninitialized. –  Mohammad Jun 15 '12 at 13:17
1  
You know, I don't think I've ever seen anything quite like const type* const& before. It feels like it would be safer (as it would involve less magic) and saner (for people reading it) to use an accessor function that returned a const std::uint8_t* instead, surely? –  Rook Jun 15 '12 at 13:22
1  
@Rook Using an accessor would certainly be preferable: more idiomatic, more readable, and more natural. –  James Kanze Jun 15 '12 at 14:24
1  
@SteveJessop No. The reference only prevents the definition of a compiler generated copy assignment operator. The copy constructor is still generated. –  James Kanze Jun 15 '12 at 15:59
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll have to fight through the spec language in 4.4/4 (of C++11), but I believe that 3.10/10 permits this. It says that object may be aliased as "a type similar to the dynamic type of the object".

In this case, the dynamic type of the object is std::uint8_t*, and the similar type is const std::uint8_t* const. I think. Check 4.4/4 for yourself.

[Update: C++03 doesn't mention "similar" types in 3.10/15, so it may be that you're in trouble on C++03, which presumably is what SNC works with.]

There's a second thing that needs to be checked, which is whether it's OK to initialize the reference data by binding it to an object that hasn't been initialized yet (m_data). Intuitively that seems OK, since the reference to the uninitialized m_data is never converted to an rvalue. It's easily fixed, anyway.

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