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I am attempting to find the latest log entries in my MySQL database. I cooked up this query late last night but upon testing today it does not seem to be returning the correct data.

SELECT MAX(id), hostName, email, info, time 
FROM log
WHERE time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) 
GROUP BY hostName 
ORDER BY `time` DESC

The query runs just fine, but none of the other fields seem to match the id column. It grabs the max id number, but the hostName, email, and info do not match the id, and they are not the latest. I've spent a few hours spinning my wheels on this (I'm a MySQL noob and just doing this for fun) so I'm pretty confused now..

Thanks for any help!

EDIT: Wow thanks for all the responses! Sorry for the confusion, I should have said "I want the latest log per hostname!" <- That is specifically what I need.

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Why do you need the MAX()? Is ordering by time not enough to get the latest log entries? –  Bulk Jun 15 '12 at 13:35
    
Hmm.. just removed it and I get data that's almost 30 mins old.. –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:37
    
Can you explain the result you want ? "Only the last entry of each host and id" ? –  Akarun Jun 15 '12 at 13:39
    
Edited main post. I want the latest log entry per each hostname –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:42
1  
Something to note about all the index suggestions: while they will help your read performance (i.e. running this query), they will most likely hurt your insert performance. If you're inserting a LOT of rows into this log table, the index maintenance may not be worth saving you the time to run the query. –  Ben Mosher Jun 15 '12 at 14:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another way to do the same thing is to GROUP BY and then JOIN to the log table:

If "latest" means the maximum id, use a (hostname, time, id) index and this:

SELECT log.id
FROM 
        log
    JOIN 
        ( SELECT MAX(id) AS id
          FROM log
          WHERE time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) 
          GROUP BY hostName
        ) AS grp
      ON grp.id = log.id ;

UPDATE: You may alo want to try this one. It just might be more efficient (depending on the hostname distribution) - and would benefit from a index: (hostname, id, time) index:

SELECT log.id
FROM 
        log
    JOIN 
        ( SELECT MAX(id) AS id
          FROM log
          GROUP BY hostName
        ) AS grp
      ON grp.id = log.id 
WHERE log.time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) ;

If "latest" means the maximum time (e.g. if time is insertion_time and is not changed later), use a (hostname, time) index and this:

SELECT log.*
FROM 
        log
    JOIN 
        ( SELECT hostname, MAX(time) AS max_time
          FROM log
          WHERE time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) 
          GROUP BY hostname
        ) AS grp
      ON  grp.hostname = log.hostname
      AND grp.max_time = log.time ;

And finally, since everyone forgot to answer the "Why mysql query is returning wrong Results?" question, here is another question with some useful answers: Why does MySQL add a feature that conflicts with SQL standards?

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Thank you, I believe I have an index on id as it is the primary key. I'm looking into adding one on hostname now! :) –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:52
1  
Not on (hostname) but on (hostname, id) –  ypercube Jun 15 '12 at 13:52
    
Hm, I didn't think of the time condition. This is not going to be easy. –  ypercube Jun 15 '12 at 13:54
    
I re-read your question. My previous query was wrong. See my edit. –  ypercube Jun 15 '12 at 14:00
    
Does "latest" means the row with the maximum id or the one with the maximum time? –  ypercube Jun 15 '12 at 14:02

You said:

I am attempting to find the latest log entries in my MySQL database

There is no need to group nor use a subquery. Just try this:

SELECT id, hostName, email, info, time FROM log
WHERE time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) 
ORDER BY `time` DESC

Now you said:

I want the latest log per hostname!

Then the solution should be this:

SELECT l1.id, l1.hostName, l1.email, l1.info, l1.time FROM log l1
LEFT JOIN log l2 on l1.hostName = l2.hostName AND l1.time < l2.time
WHERE l2.time IS NULL
ORDER BY l1.time DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but I am looking specifically for one log per hostname! –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:46
    
Quite a different question! –  Mosty Mostacho Jun 15 '12 at 13:47
    
I know, I am not good at explaining things I don't know well embarrased –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:48
    
No problem. The update should answer the new question. –  Mosty Mostacho Jun 15 '12 at 13:54

If you want the full row that corresponds to the max id for each distinct hostName,

SELECT id, hostName, email, info, time
FROM log
WHERE id IN 
    (SELECT MAX(id) FROM log WHERE time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) 
     GROUP BY hostName)
ORDER BY `time` DESC
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That query took 177 seconds to run O_O –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:47
    
Do you have the helpful index on hostName ? –  Olivier Coilland Jun 15 '12 at 13:48
    
Negative. I've heard about indexes and really should start researching them.. I'll try and add one.. –  David Jun 15 '12 at 13:49

This is a famous one:

SELECT *
FROM log
WHERE log.id IN (
    SELECT MAX(id)
    FROM log
    WHERE time >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) 
    GROUP BY hostName) T
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