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I have a Bash script on server A that finds the logged in SSH user via the logname command, even if it's run as root with sudo. If I SSH into server A from my desktop and run the script, it works fine.

However, I've set up a post-commit hook on SVN server S which SSH's into A and runs the script there, which causes logname to fail, with error "logname: no login name".

If I SSH into S from my desktop, then SSH into A from there, it works correctly, so the error must be in the fact that the SVN hook ultimately does not run from a virtual terminal.

What alternative to logname can I use here?

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Third paragraph, "If I SSH into R": Did you mean into S? –  vergenzt Jun 15 '12 at 14:00
    
@vergenzt Yes, thanks –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 14:01
    
what about whoami ? –  jglouie Jun 15 '12 at 14:04
    
The man page says that logname checks the login name from /var/run/utmp... Not sure if that helps. –  vergenzt Jun 15 '12 at 14:04
    
Does id -nu do the trick? –  Jens Jun 15 '12 at 15:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use the id command:

  $ ssh 192.168.0.227 logname
  logname: no login name

However

  $ ssh 192.168.0.227 id
  uid=502(username) gid=100(users) groups=100(users)

In a bash script you can cut the username out of the id output with something like

  $ id | cut -d "(" -f 2 | cut -d ")" -f1
  username

To have a script that works both in a sudo environment and without a terminal you could always execute different commands conditionally.

if logname &> /dev/null ; then 
    NAME=$( logname )
else 
    NAME=$( id | cut -d "(" -f 2 | cut -d ")" -f1 )
fi
echo $NAME
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Unfortunately that does not have the cross-sudo property of logname, i.e. ssh 192.168.0.277 sudo id => uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root) –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 14:06
    
An if would work, but I'd prefer to do if [ logname works ] else $SUDO_USER, because $SUDO_USER does not survive two sudos. Is there a logname works check possible? –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 14:22
    
I suppose if [ -n "$SSH_TTY" ] would work for that. –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 14:25
    
Very strange. I have if logname &> /dev/null; then echo has logname. This outputs "has logname" \n "logname: no login name" –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 14:34
    
Never mind that, in my real script (not a quick test) the same construct suddenly works. Update: Found out why. The real script is bash, while the test script is sh. –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 14:41

This is what I ended up with.

if logname &> /dev/null; then
    human_user=$(logname)
else
    if [ -n "$SUDO_USER" ]; then
        human_user=$SUDO_USER
    else
        human_user=$(whoami)
    fi
fi
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Use id -nu. No silly forking and cutting to get at the user name.

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sudo id -nu prints root, so that's not useful. –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 15:27
    
Does id -rnu then print the real UID? –  Jens Jun 15 '12 at 15:29
    
No, still root –  Bart van Heukelom Jun 15 '12 at 15:36

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