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with the following code (a boiled-down version of my original code)

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

template <typename> class A;                  // edit 1 following Mark & Matthieu
template <typename X> class A {
  X a;
  template <typename> friend class A;         // edit 1 following Mark & Matthieu
public:
  A(X x) : a(x) {}
  X get() const { return a; }                // edit 2 to avoid using A<Y>::a
  template <typename Y>
  auto diff(A<Y> const& y) const
    -> decltype(a - y.a)                       // original code causing error with gcc
    -> typename std::common_type<X, Y>::type  // alternative following Rook
    -> decltype(this->get() -                 // edit 3 not using A<X>::a
                y.get())                     // edit 2 not using A<Y>::a
  { return a - y.get(); }
};

template <typename X, typename Y>
inline auto dist(A<X> const& x, A<Y> const& y) -> decltype(std::abs(x.diff(y)))
{ return std::abs(x.diff(y)); }

int main()
{
  A<double> x(2.0), y(4.5);
  std::cout << " dist(x,y)=" << dist(x,y) << '\n'; // <-- error here
}

I get the following error with gcc 4.7.0:

test.cc: In function decltype (std::abs(x.diff(y))) dist(const A<X>&, const A<Y>&) [with X = double; Y = double; decltype (std::abs(x.diff(y))) = double]’:

test.cc:5:5: error: double A<double>::a is private

highlighted line: error: within this context

This error message is obviously not very helpful. Is there an error in my code? Or is this a problem with the compiler?

EDIT1: the friend declaration didn't help.

EDIT2: avoiding using A<Y>::a didn't help either.

EDIT3: together with EDIT2 finally fixed the problem. The decltype() in the definition of dist() requires the decltype() for A<X>::diff(), which in turn used A<X>::a, which is private in the first context.

EDTI4: Rook's suggestion of using typename std::common_type<X,Y>::type also works!

EDIT5: but see Jonathan Wakely's answer to this question

share|improve this question
    
Using gcc-4.3 your code also does not compile. See this link for the errors returned. –  PenguinCoder Jun 15 '12 at 14:43
1  
@PenguinCoder: gcc-4.3 doesn't support C++11 (aka C++0x). This question is about gcc-4.7, which does. –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 15 '12 at 14:46
1  
@JohnDibling: I would not care about MSVC in templated code, it does not implement two-phase lookup so fails to check a number of mishaps. The fact that Clang refuses it, however, is a red-herring. –  Matthieu M. Jun 15 '12 at 15:10
1  
One more question for you all... would std::common_type<X, Y> be a more appropriate type for diff() here? It looks like it should be, but I was unable to get it compiling in either gcc 4.4 or vs2010... –  Rook Jun 15 '12 at 15:37
1  
@Rook: Nice pick! I think it is safe to assume then than this is a gcc bug, since there is no reason an expression refused in decltype should later be allowed in the body. It's inconsistent. –  Matthieu M. Jun 15 '12 at 17:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

TL;DR: Gcc appears to have a bug where trailing return types on template member functions are not treated as within the class's scope.

This bug causes gcc to fail when instantiating the template member function auto diff(A<Y> const&y) const -> decltype(a-y.a) because a is private and gcc thinks private members are inaccessible here.


The code builds fine with clang and VC++, and I don't see anything trying to access A<double>::a outside A<double>, so it looks like a gcc bug to me.

Others have mentioned that A<X> and A<Y> are different classes, but that's not the case here, both are A<double>. I believe that means that friendship is not necessary in this case, although to work in the general case A<X> does need to be friends with other specializations of A.

Specifically, a in y.a is a dependent name so it cannot be looked up until A<Y> is known. At that point lookup is done, the accessibility is tested and it should be found that A<double> does have access to A<double>::a.

Here's the exact code I compiled in both clang (svn-3.2) and VC++11 (Since I'm using clang on Windows I can't #include <iostream>)

#include <cmath>

template<typename X> class A {
  X a;
public:
  A(X x) : a(x) {}
  template<typename Y>
  auto diff(A<Y> const&y) const -> decltype(a-y.a)
  { return a-y.a; }
};

template<typename X, typename Y>
inline auto dist(A<X> const&x, A<Y> const&y) -> decltype(std::abs(x.diff(y)))
{ return std::abs(x.diff(y)); }

int main()
{
  A<double> x(2.0), y(4.5);
  return (int) dist(x,y);
}

This code results in build errors on gcc 4.5 similar to what you describe.

Replacing

auto diff(A<Y> const&y) const -> decltype(a-y.a)

with

auto diff(A<Y> const&y) const -> typename std::common_type<X,Y>::type

causes the code to work on gcc 4.5.

This indicates to me a bug where gcc is failing to treat trailing return types as inside the class's scope. Some testing reveals that the trailing return type must be on a template function to trigger the bug.

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2  
No, see other answers. It's just that A<X> and A<Y> are different types, so they cannot access each other's private members –  Tony The Lion Jun 15 '12 at 14:48
    
Ah, interesting. I would say that diff is ill-defined because it cannot access y.a in general (unless Y happens to be X); but I would not bet whether it should be diagnosed at declaration or instantiation. –  Matthieu M. Jun 15 '12 at 14:48
    
@MatthieuM. I believe that if there are no legal instantiations then it's ill-formed and can be diagnosed at declaration or instantiation. However there are legal instantiations and so I believe it should only be diagnosed on those instantiations which are not legal. –  bames53 Jun 15 '12 at 14:53
    
@MatthieuM. Obviously templates can't be considered ill-formed simply because there's some intantiation that is illegal. This template simply requires that y.a be legal, just like template<typename T> void foo(T t) { t.bar(); } requires that t.bar() be legal. –  bames53 Jun 15 '12 at 15:18
2  
I think it's this bug gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=52816 –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 15 '12 at 18:42

There is an error with your code:

template<typename Y>
  auto diff(A<Y> const&y) const -> decltype(a-y.a)
  { return a-y.a; }

Here, A<Y> is a different type, so A<X> cannot see it's a data member. Only A<Y> can see A<Y>::a.

Edit: that said, in your particular case, X and Y are both double, so I would naively expect that to compile. Note that in the best of cases, this construction should only compile when X and Y are the same, which may not be what you want.

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Since it compiles correctly in VS2010, is it then a bug in VS2010? –  Patrick Jun 15 '12 at 14:50
2  
This was my first thought, but I'm a bit skeptical, because in his particular in case (nevermind, your edit says exactly what I was going to say) –  Benjamin Lindley Jun 15 '12 at 14:50
    
@Patrick I wouldn't assume that because it compiles on VS2010 then it follows that the bug is in GCC. But right now I cannot say for sure whether it is a bug or not. This stuff is all quite new... –  juanchopanza Jun 15 '12 at 15:04
    
this was not the solution, see my edit2 –  Walter Jun 15 '12 at 15:21
    
@Walter what error do you get? –  juanchopanza Jun 15 '12 at 15:24

auto diff(A<Y> const&y) const -> decltype(a-y.a) is the problem; regardless of anything else, if X and Y are different types, A<X> and A<Y> are different types and cannot peek at each other's privates. Templates are not covariant!

The specific error here might be an eccentricity of GCC (in that it doesn't spot that X is the same type as Y) but the more general case where you might be trying to diff two different types (and why else would you have a separate template type in your diff function?) will never work, regardless of compiler.

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While you were correct about the line which contains the problem, you were wrong about the reason. It's the usage of a as well as y.a that caused the problem, not the access of A<Y>::a from A<X>, but the access of both from decltype() in the global function dist(). –  Walter Jun 15 '12 at 15:50
    
Yeah, nested issues. It was an impressively complex problem! –  Rook Jun 15 '12 at 15:55

Your function auto diff(A<Y> const& y) access the private variable A::a from outside the class in your decltype statement.

Your A::a should be public if you want to use it the way you do in your diff function.

EDIT: it seems the friendship solution is much better suited for this problem, then just making it public.

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I believe trailing return types are inside the classes scope. –  bames53 Jun 15 '12 at 14:47
    
a getter is the same as just making it public, and I don't appreciate your nasty comments –  Tony The Lion Jun 15 '12 at 14:53
2  
A getter is not the same as making it public, as you still don't have write access. But neither of those options should be considered in this case unless there is no other way around the problem, as it would be a change in the interface of the class. –  Benjamin Lindley Jun 15 '12 at 14:58
    
neither the friendship solution nor the other solution whereby I avoid using A<Y>::a in A<X> helped, see edits –  Walter Jun 15 '12 at 15:22

As I have figured out by now (see also the edits to the question) what the problem was. It turns out that all answers (sofar) didn't solve the (full) problem.

Essentially, the evaluation of the decltype expression for the global function required eventually the private member A<X>::a (through its occurrence in the decltype expression of A<x>::diff()). This opens the next question about what the standard says about this.

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