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I am trying to copy all the methods and attributes from a class to an instance of another class. Unfortunately I am having issues with properties. Here's an example:

class ToAdd(object):
    @property
    def foo(self):
        return 'foo!'

class Base(object):
    pass

b = Base()
for item, val in ToAdd.__dict__.iteritems():
    if not item.startswith('__'):
        setattr(b, item, val)

When calling b.foo I expect to get 'foo!', but instead it returns <property at 0x104a73d08>.

Note that this is akin to a mixin, but I want it to work on instances instead of classes.

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Have you tried b.foo()? –  Hans Z Jun 15 '12 at 15:00
    
What problem are you trying to solve? –  Sven Marnach Jun 15 '12 at 15:02
    
Hans: It does not work. And what I want is to keep it as @property, so even if it worked it was not what want. –  Nova Jun 15 '12 at 15:05
    
@SvenMarnach I want to create a dynamic mixin (that can work on instances), but it needs to work on new-style classes. –  Nova Jun 15 '12 at 15:12
    
@Nova: This kind of magic is usually not necessary. If you really want to go that route, use a dynamically created type, not an instance. –  Sven Marnach Jun 15 '12 at 15:13
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is probably a way to accomplish what you want with less "magic", but it is possible to change an instance's class...

class ToAdd(object):
    @property
    def foo(self):
        return 'foo!'

class Base(object):
    pass

b = Base()

NewBase = type('NewBase', (Base, ToAdd), {})
b.__class__ = NewBase
print(b.foo)
# foo!
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You know it will be your fault if this kind of thing starts appearing in the wild? :) –  Sven Marnach Jun 15 '12 at 15:40
    
I'm secretly hoping someone finds an organized use for this... :) –  unutbu Jun 15 '12 at 15:45
    
I tried something like that previously, but there was something else (which I fixed now) preventing it from work. Your example made it much clearer, thanks! –  Nova Jun 15 '12 at 15:59
    
Okay, it turns out that even though this solution generally works, it cannot be used with django models because it ends up colliding with fancy stuff it does internally with __class__. Back to square one. :( –  Nova Jun 18 '12 at 10:53
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Properties (and more generally, descriptors) only work on types, not on instances, so this won't work. You will not only get problems with the properties, but also with the methods, because your approach breaks the implict passing of the self parameter.

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You can get it work with methods by using setattr(b, item, types.MethodType(val, b)). I can't find a way to fix properties, though. –  Nova Jun 15 '12 at 15:06
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