Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm really new to Rails and I try to setup a module file to be used in the view. So I believe the correct behavior is to define the module as a helper within a controller and voila, it should be working. However, that's not the case for me. Here is the structure.

lib
  functions
    -- form_manager.rb

form_manager.rb:

Module Functions 
  Module FormManager
    def error_message() ...
    end
  end
end 

users_controller.rb

class UsersController < ApplicationController

   helper FormManager

   def new ...

Well, the structure is like the above and when I call the error_message from new.html.erb it gives me the error: uninitialized constant UsersController::FormManager.

So, first of all, I know that in rails 3 lib is not automatically loaded. Assuming that it is not mandatory to autoload the lib folder, how can I make this work and what am I missing?

BTW, please don't say that this question is duplicate. I'm telling you I've been searching for this crap for almost 2 days.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your module is not autoloaded (at least not in 3.2.6). You have to load it explicitly. You can achieve this with the following line of code

 # in application.rb
 config.autoload_paths += %W(#{config.root}/lib)

You can check your autoload paths with Rails.application.config.autoload_paths. Maybe it's indeed defined for you?

Now you're sure your module gets loaded, you can check it in rails console by calling

> Functions::FormHelper

Now you can't use that module as a view helper by default. Use #included to define the helper when your module gets included. You achieve "lazy evaluation" this way. I think the problem with your code is that the helper method gets called before the module gets included. (somebody should correct me if I'm wrong)

Here's the code:

Module Functions 
  Module FormManager
    def error_message() ...
    end

    def self.included m
      return unless m < ActionController::Base
      m.helper_method :error_message
    end

  end
end 

You should also remove the helper line from your controller.

EDIT:

You can achieve this without autoloading. Just use require "functions/form_manager". You define a helper_method for every method. If you wish use all the module methods as helpers use

def self.included m
  return unless m < ActionController::Base
  m.helper_method self.instance_methods
end

EDIT2:

It appears that you don't need to use self.included. This achieves the same functionality:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base

  include Functions::FormManager
  helper_method Functions::FormManager.instance_methods

end
share|improve this answer
1  
This has worked, thanks a lot! :) However, if I remove the helper it does not work, so better leave it as it is :) BTW, isn't there any other method except autoloading? Because I believe that when you autoload then even if you are not using the module it will be loaded anyway. And a second question: should I list every method in the module as you did in the included method? (I mean, like m.helper_method :create_form, m.helper_method :destroy_form etc...) –  Savas Vedova Jun 15 '12 at 16:40
    
Hm, doesn't work without helper? Weird. Updated the post with the answers. You should have asked the question earlier, I'm sorry you've wasted 2 days on this :( –  shime Jun 15 '12 at 17:01
    
Doesn't work without autoload as well. I guess I'll have to stick with the autoload. Thanks again! –  Savas Vedova Jun 15 '12 at 18:00
    
Actually it does. Use "require" instead of "include" when autoload is off. –  Savas Vedova Jun 15 '12 at 19:09
    
well i've said that you should use require :) –  shime Jun 15 '12 at 20:38

It appears you are namespacing FormManager inside of Functions which means you would call it by helper Functions::FormManager

Try that

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.