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I have a string in the following format yyyyMMdd and I am trying to get it to look like this:

yyyy-MM-dd

When I try:

string date = "20121004";

Convert.ToDateTime(date).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd");

I get the error:

FormatException: String was not recognized as a valid DateTime.

Would the following work or would I run into a problem:

private string GetValidDate(string date,string format)
{
    DateTime result;
    if(DateTime.TryParseExact(date, "yyyy-MM-dd", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out result))
    {
        return date;
    }
    else if(DateTime.TryParseExact(date, "yyyyMMdd", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out result))
    { 
        return DateTime.ParseExact(date, "yyyyMMdd",
                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd");
     }
     else
     {
        return "Invalid Date Format";
     }
}
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1  
Are you guaranteed the yyyyMMdd format in the source string? If so, why not just use string methods to add the hyphens? –  jglouie Jun 15 '12 at 15:38
    
I thought about that. What is the best method for that? –  Xaisoft Jun 15 '12 at 15:40
    
There's a string-based answer below. It seems pretty reasonable –  jglouie Jun 15 '12 at 15:43
1  
the straight string manipulation also depends if you need any validation on the fields, too. –  jglouie Jun 15 '12 at 15:44
    
In your second case, you can just return result.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd"); no need to parse date again. –  comecme Jun 15 '12 at 18:41
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Just use the DateTime.ParseExact method:

string date = "20121004";

string result = DateTime.ParseExact(date, "yyyyMMdd",
                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd");

This also provides the advantage of validating the date before reformatting it with the hyphens. ParseExact throws an exception you can catch, if the date is not in valid range, or the format does not match.

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+1 DateTime.ParseExact is the correct way to handle custom formats. –  Felice Pollano Jun 15 '12 at 15:44
    
Is it necessary if I know the Date is always valid? Just curious. –  Xaisoft Jun 15 '12 at 15:44
1  
When dealing with dates, I personally think it is always essential to validate them before processing them further. –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 15 '12 at 15:46
    
OK, good point. Thanks for this. –  Xaisoft Jun 15 '12 at 15:47
3  
"throws an exception you can catch" If you want to handle error situations, use TryParseExact instead of exception catching. (Exceptions should not be used for normal program flow control.) –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 15 '12 at 15:54
show 9 more comments

I get the error:

FormatException: String was not recognized as a valid DateTime.

You are getting this error because you are not telling the ToDateTime() method how to figure out to parse your string.

If you use the following method:

public static DateTime ParseExact(
    string s,
    string format,
    IFormatProvider provider,
    DateTimeStyles style
)

You won't get this error. After you generate a DateTime variable just display it in the format yyyy-dd-mm using the ToString() method.

public string ToString(
    string format,
    IFormatProvider provider
)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8tfzyc64
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9h21f14e

I know this basically repeats the same information as everyone else but it also provides him the ability to understand what the two methods he needs to use actually does.

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Thanks the the detailed explanation. –  Xaisoft Jun 15 '12 at 15:52
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string date = "20121004";
date = date.Insert(6,"-");
date = date.Insert(4,"-");
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If the user used this code date would only be equal to 10-04 which is clearly not what he wants. Furthermore it would allow the string "20129999" which is clearly not a valid date. –  Ramhound Jun 15 '12 at 15:46
    
@Ramhound: The code sets date to "2012-10-04". Why do you think it will be 10-04? –  comecme Jun 15 '12 at 19:48
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It's a little ugly, but how about this?

date.Insert(6, "-").Insert(4, "-");

If you can assume you're coming in with a string representing a valid date and you don't need to do any other date-ish logic, then why go to a DateTime in the first place?

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Maybe he needs to make sure the date is valid first. The DateTime.ParseExact just does this. –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 15 '12 at 15:43
2  
The real question is the reason his code is not working. While this code basically will give him what he wants, it seems silly, to provide ugly code. –  Ramhound Jun 15 '12 at 15:44
    
+1, he is just trying to add hypthens into. And wants it displayed as a valid datetime, aka correct format. He doesn't specify checking the date is valid, and as such, we can assume his date is already valid. –  Doomsknight Jun 15 '12 at 15:48
    
I counter your argument with the question that if he ultimately needs to insert two hyphens, why is he going through expensive DateTime conversion algorithms to do so? The OP said nothing about validating dates first. –  Tenner Jun 15 '12 at 15:49
1  
@Ramhound: No need to change history for rep points. Thanks for the offer, but it's still an ugly shortcut and I don't deny that. :-) –  Tenner Jun 15 '12 at 16:11
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Here is an extension method I use.

/// <summary>
/// Converts a string to a dateTime with the given format and kind.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="dateTimeString">The date time string.</param>
/// <param name="dateTimeFormat">The date time format.</param>
/// <param name="dateTimeKind">Kind of the date time.</param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static DateTime ToDateTime(this string dateTimeString, string dateTimeFormat, DateTimeKind dateTimeKind)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(dateTimeString))
    {
        return DateTime.MinValue;
    }

    DateTime dateTime;
    try
    {
        dateTime = DateTime.SpecifyKind(DateTime.ParseExact(dateTimeString, dateTimeFormat, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), dateTimeKind);
    }
    catch (FormatException)
    {
        dateTime = DateTime.MinValue;
    }

    return dateTime;
}
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