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I've been assigned to develop a software on Linux, opensuse 11.4. Now the issue is that I'm a Java developer and I want to make that software on Java. Can I use Eclipse IDE for this software? It will be a desktop application on Linux. If Eclipse supports this type of development, what plug-ins do I need to get it started? Plus I need to use some library routines as well. Can I do all this using Java and Eclipse IDE and some additional plug-ins? Any help would be highly appreciated.

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+1 Given the three answers and the mysterious -1, I feel compelled to upvote this question. –  Erick Robertson Jun 15 '12 at 16:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may not realize it, but there are two distinct parts to this question. The response depends somewhat on whether you've already decided what GUI toolkit to use. The two obvious choices for a Java app are AWT/Swing (Java's "standard" GUI frameworks) or Eclipse's SWT/RCP. You see, Eclipse is more than just an IDE, it's a platform on which you can build applications. Here is the official description, and here is a very good intro and tutorial. Of course has plenty of tooling built-in to help you develop an RCP app.

If you're looking to stick with AWT/Swing, then Eclipse also has tooling to help with that. Specifically, WindowBuilder (WB) is included in the Eclipse IDE for Java Developers package that you can download. WB helps a lot in designing and implementing your GUI.

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WindowBuilder is also available for SWT, not just Swing. –  user714965 Jun 15 '12 at 15:56
    
I'm not giving this response a +1 for two reasons. First, I don't know anything about SWT/RCP. Second, I abhor visual GUI builders. I have seen WindowBuilder in action, and I have nothing specific against it aside from it being a GUI builder. I always code my GUI's manually using (almost exclusively) GroupLayout, and I have some great-looking GUI's. –  Erick Robertson Jun 15 '12 at 16:14
    
Thanks @E-Riz for that. I was wondering, can a program be written in Java to give the overall performance of the system? I mean what I've studied so far is that it gives the overall performance of the JVM not the actual performance of the overall system. Can you guide me on it? –  Ingila Ejaz Jun 17 '12 at 10:50
    
@IngilaEjaz, that's a separate topic, so post it as a separate question. –  E-Riz Jun 18 '12 at 1:29

Java is (almost) write once, run anywhere (WORA). Thus any Java program you write should be able to run on any architecture and operating system that supports Java. In other words, you don't need to do anything extra to make your program run properly on Linux.

Eclipse can package your application in nice JAR files and the like which can be distributed to any OS.

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Which is in fact exactly what my job is. –  Erick Robertson Jun 15 '12 at 16:10
    
Thanks @Erick Robertson, for that. I was wondering, can a program be written in Java to give the overall performance of the system? I mean what I've studied so far is that it gives the overall performance of the JVM not the actual performance of the overall system. Can you guide me on it? –  Ingila Ejaz Jun 17 '12 at 10:52
    
I don't understand "to give the overall performance of the system". Java applications sometimes run slower than native apps, but they also sometimes run faster. It depends on the application. There's a lot to be learned in this area, so it's good to take @E-Riz's advice and post a separate question. –  Erick Robertson Jun 18 '12 at 11:37

Just download Eclipse IDE for Java Developers. You won't need any plug-ins.

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Note: Not Eclipse IDE for Java EE Developers, which is the top link. While you can develop desktop apps in this environment, it's not ideal. You want the third one down. –  Erick Robertson Jun 15 '12 at 16:11

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