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I just want to be able to do ./whatever.jar instead of java -jar whatever.jar.

I've found a way:

#!/bin/bash
java -jar $0 $*
exit
# jar goes here...

but it doesn't work. Java just complains that it's an invalid/corrupt jarfile.

I also tried piping:

#!/bin/bash
tail -n +4 $0 | java -jar
exit
# jar goes here...

but this doesn't work.

One way to do it is to somehow split the file into two separate parts (the script part and the jar part), and then execute the jar, but that'd be redundant. You'd might as well make a script that executes the jar and execute that script.

So I need to figure out how to somehow tail it and fake the file.

I thought I could do it using /dev/stdout:

#!/bin/bash
java -jar /dev/stdout
tail -n +5 $0
exit
# jar goes here...

That doesn't work either. It just prints the contents of the jar and java complains that it's invalid. (I figured out later that there's nothing to read in /dev/stdout)

So I need to read from stdout some other way. I really wish I could pipe it though. It would make things SO much easier :)

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I don't think this is a doable thing, other than "make some other script that runs java -jar myjar.jar itself. –  Louis Wasserman Jun 15 '12 at 15:42
    
How did you create your script in the first version? Did you include a valid MANIFEST file? Please supply the commands that you used. –  HonkyTonk Jun 15 '12 at 15:51
    
You may have to consider tools like launch4j.sourceforge.net. –  Jayan Jun 15 '12 at 15:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming you have the kernel source code installed, check out /usr/src/linux/Documentation/java.txt for a way to run Java code directly using the kernel's BINFMT_MISC support (assuming it's compiled into the version of the kernel you're running, but I think it is on most major distros). If you don't have the source installed, you should be able to find it online easy enough (here's one example).

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I actually found this after seeing @Gareth Davis's answer –  biggles5107 Jun 15 '12 at 16:56
    
Where I found it was: git.kernel.org/gitweb.cgi?p=linux/kernel/git/torvalds/… –  biggles5107 Jun 15 '12 at 17:39
    
It'd be a good idea to put it in fstab, since it doesn't work after reboot otherwise. –  biggles5107 Jun 17 '12 at 17:50

You need a service called jexec some linux distros come with this installed check for /etc/init.d/jexec. My CentOS 5.5 definitely does.

What it does is register the jexec interpreter with the binfmt system.

For more information you might what to have a quick read of binfmt_misc.

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I'll look into it. Thanks! –  biggles5107 Jun 15 '12 at 16:02
    
I don't have jexec (Kubuntu 12.04, OpenJDK 6) –  biggles5107 Jun 15 '12 at 20:58

FYI, if you wanted to do it your original way it would go like this:

$ cat jar.sh
#!/usr/bin/env bash
java -jar <(tail -n +4 "$0")
exit

$ cat jar.sh runme.jar > works.jar

$ chmod a+x works.jar

$ ./works.jar

Presuming a recent bash with support for <()

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that doesn't work either. –  biggles5107 Jun 15 '12 at 16:56
    
@bi99l35: Of course it works. If you have a problem, post the error you get. –  Sorpigal Jun 17 '12 at 11:50
    
Invalid or corrupt jarfile /dev/fd/63 - That makes sense, since block devices are not regular files. –  biggles5107 Jul 28 '12 at 22:35

java -jar does not work with stdin, apparently it does some seeks rather than straight reads. On a system you can't mod, you have to use a tmp. for example.

#!/bin/bash
JF=/tmp/junk$$.jar
(uudecode -o /dev/stdout >$JF;java -jar $JF;unlink $JF) <<JAR
begin-base64 644 junk.jar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====
JAR
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Write a separate shell script:

whatever.sh

#!/bin/bash
java -jar whatever.jar $*

You can't make the JAR file directly executable because it's not an executable file. It's Java bytecode which can't be read directly by the machine nor any standard shell interpreter that I know of.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not really what I'm looking for though. I just want to be able to do ./whatever.jar! –  biggles5107 Jun 15 '12 at 15:46
1  
The problem is, Java bytecode isn't executable, nor is it a script. When you use ./ to execute something, the shell expects one of those two. –  tskuzzy Jun 15 '12 at 15:50

Or I could just install the jarwrapper (Ubuntu) package.

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