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I have encountered an issue trying to read a registry entry on Windows server 2008. The puzzling thing is the code does work on a different server that is also 2008, but is R2. I have checked and the registry entry is in place, and I ran the program as Administrator. Below is a code sample. The regitry key returned by Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey is null. This is a 64 bit application

string strPath = "";
try
{
    //The registry key:
    //SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths\SnmpClient.exe
    using (RegistryKey rk = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(strKey))
    {
            try
            {
                //InstallDirectory
                if (!(rk.GetValue(strValue) == null))
                {
                    strPath += rk.GetValue(strValue).ToString();
                }
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            }
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
}
return strPath;
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1  
Does an exception get thrown? –  Arran Jun 15 '12 at 16:16
1  
What's your question? –  Achim Jun 15 '12 at 16:16
    
What is the issue? Does it throw an exception and if so on which line and what is the exception? –  Chris Jun 15 '12 at 16:16
1  
Please provide more details on the problem. We need to know if your application is being ran as a x86 or x64 application. We also need the EXACT exception message and any code it references. –  Ramhound Jun 15 '12 at 16:19
    
The regitry key returned by Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey is null. This is a 64 bit machine. I –  John Jun 15 '12 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

You haven't said if you're compiling your app as 32 or 64-bit.

If you are compiling the application as a 32-bit one, it'll get redirected to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ Wow6432Node \Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths...

Either check that the correct key is there too, or compile in 64-bit.

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Here is how you can open up the 64-bit hive.

var localMachine = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(Microsoft.Win32.RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry64);
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