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I am trying to get a timer run every minute in sync with the system clock (00:01:00, 00:02:00, 00:03:00, etc). This is my code.

private System.Timers.Timer timer;

public frmMain()
{
    timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
    timer.AutoReset = false;
    timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);
    timer.Interval = GetInterval();
    timer.Start();
}

private void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{

        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss tt"));
            timer.Interval = GetInterval();
            timer.Start();

}
private double GetInterval()
{
    DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
    return ((60 - now.Second) * 1000 - now.Millisecond);
}

It runs perfectly on my home PC.

12:12:00 AM
12:13:00 AM
12:14:00 AM
12:15:00 AM
12:16:00 AM
12:17:00 AM
12:18:00 AM
12:19:00 AM
12:20:00 AM
12:21:00 AM

However I'm getting weird results on my VPS (windows server 2003).

12:11:59 AM
12:12:59 AM
12:13:00 AM
12:13:59 AM
12:14:00 AM
12:14:59 AM
12:15:00 AM
12:15:59 AM
12:16:00 AM
12:16:59 AM
12:17:00 AM
12:17:59 AM
12:18:00 AM
12:18:59 AM
12:19:00 AM
12:19:59 AM
12:20:00 AM
12:20:59 AM
12:21:00 AM

Is it because System.Timers.Timer does not work well on windows server 2003? Or is it an issue with my VPS?

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1  
No timer will be perfectly accurate. –  SLaks Jun 15 '12 at 16:22
    
I know but my timer is accurate down to milliseconds. It runs perfectly on normal PCs. –  user1437139 Jun 15 '12 at 16:27
    
Please see "Stack Overflow is not in need of your SEO skills". –  John Saunders Jun 16 '12 at 3:02
    
possible duplicate of C#, System.Timers.Timer, run every 15min in sync with system clock by the same user. –  Henk Holterman Jun 22 '12 at 21:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of using DateTime.Now and pulling the individual parts, just use the Ticks. Get the ticks when you start, then calculate what the ticks should be for the next timer tick. Once that timer tick occurs use the last value to calculate what the next value should be.

Example:

    private const long MILLISECOND_IN_MINUTE = 60 * 1000;
    private const long TICKS_IN_MILLISECOND = 10000;
    private const long TICKS_IN_MINUTE = MILLISECOND_IN_MINUTE * TICKS_IN_MILLISECOND;

    private System.Timers.Timer timer;
    private long nextIntervalTick;

    public void frmMain()
    {
        timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
        timer.AutoReset = false;
        timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);
        timer.Interval = GetInitialInterval();
        timer.Start();
    }

    private void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {

        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss tt"));
        timer.Interval = GetInterval();
        timer.Start();

    }
    private double GetInitialInterval()
    {
        DateTime now = DateTime.Now;
        double timeToNextMin = ((60 - now.Second) * 1000 - now.Millisecond) + 15;
        nextIntervalTick = now.Ticks + ((long)timeToNextMin * TICKS_IN_MILLISECOND);

        return timeToNextMin;
    }
    private double GetInterval()
    {
        nextIntervalTick += TICKS_IN_MINUTE;
        return TicksToMs(nextIntervalTick - DateTime.Now.Ticks);
    }
    private double TicksToMs(long ticks)
    {
        return (double)(ticks / TICKS_IN_MILLISECOND);
    }

You could probably do this using Seconds and Milliseconds like you were. The trick is to have one starting point to calculate off of (rather then determining how many seconds to the next minute). If there are additional concerns not mentioned in the original problem, like the code in timer_Elapsed might take longer then a minute to run, then you will need to add code to handle this.

Please leave a comment if you need additional help. Otherwise please select a correct answer.

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Thanks! I've tried running it. But there is something wrong with GetInterval(). It returns 0. Also, wouldn't this line nextIntervalTick += TICKS_IN_MINUTE; make nextIntervalTick eventually overflow ? –  user1437139 Jun 15 '12 at 17:21
    
@user1437139 Sorry, TicksToMs should have divided by TICKS_IN_MILLISECOND instead of TICKS_IN_MINUTE. Code has been updated and corrected. –  Trisped Jun 15 '12 at 20:37
    
It runs perfectly on my PC. [9:30:00 AM, 9:31:00 AM, 9:32:00 AM, 9:33:00 AM, 9:34:00 AM, 9:35:00 AM] But I'm stil getting bad results on my VPS (off by one second). [9:29:59 AM, 9:30:59 AM, 9:31:59 AM, 9:32:59 AM, 9:33:59 AM, 9:34:59 AM] I think something needs to be done with GetInitialInterval() –  user1437139 Jun 16 '12 at 1:56
    
@user1437139 Add 15 to timeToNextMin in GetInitialInterval (example updated). Better yet, change DateTime.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss tt")to DateTime.Now.ToString("hh:mm:ss.fffffff tt") and add the number of milliseconds needed to bring it up to the correct time. So if 12:01.9915 then add 9 to timeToNextMin –  Trisped Jun 16 '12 at 2:46
1  
Christ... It is all contained in my answer which was first! You are resetting the interval each time so the drift is not cumulative. How have you not bothered to read all the answers? –  Totero Jun 16 '12 at 10:51

Normal timers like System.Timers.Timer are not accurate and not nearly good enough to achieve a 1 msec interval.

Firstly they have an internal update rate of 10-15 msec. Secondly depending on the system other threads may run for ~15 msec delaying your timer before Windows forces them to yield.

If you want more accuracy than Timer use System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch as reported in another thread it can go from 0.3 ms and is integrated with your .NET environment.

Another option is to use a multimedia time (accurate to around 1ms).

Either way here is an excellent tutorial on the issue.

Breaking it down:

Timer drift normally adds a delay to the timer. But you are seeing the opposite happen. As timers do not have millisecond accuracy (they are only accurate to in the 15ms range) they will often be fired with that granularity. So in effect firing the timer a few milliseconds before the minute mark on some occasions (causing it to fire immediately afterwards aswell). If you require it to only fire in the new minute I would add in a few milliseconds of a wait time to compensate (5ms should do it).

Your home pc is not so fast (which means it exhibits extra timer drift dealing with the timer handler) and normally fires the event in the next second. Your work PC sometimes manages to handle the timer event quick enough that it records 59 seconds past (which I do believe is truncated and probably 59.900 ~ 59.999). This may also occur if the machine is multi-cored as there is no thread yeilding delay and the timer can be fired very quickly.

That is the cause of your Timer irregularities.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't need 1 msec accuracy. Half a second is good enough. My question is why am I getting weird results on windows server 2003? –  user1437139 Jun 15 '12 at 16:31
    
Stopwatch is not the right tool for this. That measures time only. The OP wants to run code every time a certain interval has elapsed. –  Paul Phillips Jun 15 '12 at 16:31
    
@PaulPhillips what about a BackgroundWorker in a while loop that checks the Stopwatch and if it is time to execute, call the ReportProgress(0) method to update the GUI –  Cole Johnson Jun 15 '12 at 16:34
    
O.K. I have explained further. –  Totero Jun 15 '12 at 17:14

((60 - now.Second) * 1000 - now.Millisecond)

This means that if now.Second happens to be 59 your time will fire again in less than a second. This is the reason for your weird results (the timer not firing at exactly 0 second offsets).

It's probably more productive for you to have the timer fire every second, keep the previous date/time value in a separate variable, and update the on-screen timer when the second portion changes.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see a problem with ((60 - now.Second) * 1000 - now.Millisecond). If the timer gets initialized when now.Second=59, the timer will fire in less than a second. By the time it fires, now.Second will be 00. Timer's new interval will be calculated and it will fire again exactly at 00 (after 60 seconds). –  user1437139 Jun 15 '12 at 16:55

Remember that Windows Server is by default set up to share resources with background tasks more willingly than the client versions so timer accuracy can be affected if the server is running a number of background tasks.

You could try temporarily changing it to prioritise the foreground task to see if that gives different results - the setting is somewhere in the System control panel, you're looking for two radio buttons, one that says "Programs" and one that says "Background services" or similar.

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