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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

  if(argc != 3){
    printf("Usage: ./copy filename newfile\n");
    exit(1);
  }

  int bytes;
  long file_size, file_copied_size;
  FILE *file_to_copy, *new_file;

  if((file_to_copy = fopen(argv[1], "rb")) == NULL){
    printf("File cannot be opened - read\n");
    exit(1);
  }
  if((new_file = fopen(argv[2], "wb")) == NULL){
    printf("File cannot be opened - write\n");
    exit(1);
  }

  fseek(file_to_copy, 0, SEEK_END);
  file_size = ftell(file_to_copy);
  rewind(file_to_copy);

  char *buffer = malloc(1024 * 1024); /* Imposto un buffer di 1MB per maggiore efficienza */ 
  if(!buffer){
    printf("Errore allocazione memoria\n");
    fclose(file_to_copy);
    fclose(new_file);
    exit(1);
  }

   /* In questo modo copio file grandi 1MB alla volta così il trasferimento è più veloce ed efficiente inoltre fread() ritorna 0 quando c'è un errore o quando incontra EOF */
  //while ((bytes=fread(buffer, 1, sizeof(buffer), file_to_copy)) > 0){
  while (!feof(file_to_copy)){
    bytes = fread(buffer, 1, sizeof(buffer), file_to_copy);
    fwrite(buffer, 1, bytes, new_file);
    if(ferror(new_file)){
      perror("Errore scrittura"); /* perror printa anche l'errore che ferror ha incontrato */
      fclose(file_to_copy);
      fclose(new_file);
      exit(1);
    }
  }

  fseek(new_file, 0, SEEK_END);
  file_copied_size = ftell(new_file);
  rewind(new_file);
  if(file_size != file_copied_size){
    printf("Il file %s non è stato copiato correttamente\n", argv[2]);
  }
  else{
    printf("File successfully copied :)\n");
  }  
  fclose(file_to_copy);
  fclose(new_file);
  free(buffer);

  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

EDIT: i've updated the code
I have some doubts:
1) I have to check the return code of fread because - for example - if bytes become 0 due to an error, 0 will be written into the copied file.
But my question is: how to do it? Because fread can return 0 but can also return a short value ....
2) how can read go throught the file? If i copy a 5MB file how can fread move from 1MB in 1MB without something that say to it "hey you have to put your offset 1MB after the 1MB you've just copied"?
3) why not to clear the buffer after every use? I mean something like:

while (!feof(file_to_copy)){
        bytes = fread(buffer, 1, sizeof(buffer), file_to_copy);
        fwrite(buffer, 1, bytes, new_file);
        memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
}
share|improve this question
    
try storing in size_t instead of an int –  nims Jun 15 '12 at 16:37
    
stack overflow :( –  polslinux Jun 15 '12 at 16:40
    
@polslinux, I usually use fread(buffer, file_size, 1, file_to_copy), and check the return of fread whether is equal to 1 –  MYMNeo Jun 15 '12 at 17:01

3 Answers 3

Usually, you don't want to try to copy an entire file in a single read/write cycle. This has (among other things) a fairly substantial chance of your memory allocation failing, or being horribly inefficient if you end up allocating/using some virtual memory.

Instead, you usually want to allocate a buffer of reasonable size (say, a megabyte or two) then do the copying in a loop, something like:

char *buffer = malloc(1024 * 1024);  

while ((bytes=fread(buffer, 1, sizeof(buffer), infile)) > 0)
    fwrite(buffer, 1, bytes, outfile);

You can, of course, also check the return value from fwrite and (for example) exit the loop if it doesn't write the amount you requested. This is particularly important if, for example, you're moving a file instead of just copying it -- you only want to remove the original when/if you're certain the copy has succeeded.

share|improve this answer
    
but how can i check the return value of fwrite? I got a stack overflow :( –  polslinux Jun 15 '12 at 16:48
    
but why do you check bytes > 0 ? Does fread return 0 when it reach the EOF? And also why you don't "clear" the buffer before reusing it? –  polslinux Jun 15 '12 at 16:55
    
@polslinux: fread returns the number of items it read successfully, so we write that number back out. Yes, when it can't read anything it returns 0 (regardless of whether that's from end of file or something else like a disk error). You don't need to clear the buffer, because the only part we use is the part that fread had just written to. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 15 '12 at 22:53
    
Ah ok i've understand...but what i don't unserstand is: if we allocate 1MB for the buffer and we write 1MB into the buffer, next time we write into it - for example - 400KB there are other 600KB that have been written and are dirty...or the malloced buffer doesn't work like array?? –  polslinux Jun 16 '12 at 7:01
    
@polslinux: Look carefully -- we keep the return value from fread in bytes. When we call fwrite, we pass bytes (i.e., the amount that was read) as to amount to write. So, if we read a whole buffer full, that's what we write -- but if we only read a partial buffer, that's how much we write. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 16 '12 at 15:03

You call ferror() to check the error status of an I/O stream if the fread/fwrite doesn't copy the number of chars you expect

share|improve this answer
    
oh thanks! This can be good :) EDIT: is this right? while ((bytes=fread(buffer, 1, sizeof(buffer), file_to_copy)) > 0){ fwrite(buffer, 1, bytes, new_file); if(ferror(new_file){ printf("Errore scrittura\n"); fclose(file_to_copy); fclose(new_file); exit(1); } } –  polslinux Jun 15 '12 at 16:58
1  
@polslinux - yes, see also perror() it prints the actual system error message that ferror() found –  Martin Beckett Jun 15 '12 at 17:04
    
Ok, thanks a lot :) –  polslinux Jun 15 '12 at 17:05

According to your posted code, I think you have made a mistake at this line.

fwrite(buffer, 1, file_size, file_to_copy);

you try to write something into the file_to_copy which is already closed, that is not allowed by program, so it gives you a stackoverflow.

share|improve this answer
    
O.o i'm an idiot xD the smallest error is always the most difficult to find :D –  polslinux Jun 15 '12 at 17:08

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