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class A
{
public:
    A* operator->() const
    {
    }
    void Test() {}
};

then call it like this.

A* a = new A;
a->Test();

The code builds and runs successfully in VC2010. It seems very strange. I am wondering it is by design or it is a bug of VC2010?

Thanks

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2  
"the code builds and runs" - so what is the problem? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 15 '12 at 16:40
    
So does it or does it not work? –  Eitan T Jun 15 '12 at 16:41
    
As you see, "operator->" returns nothing. I think the compiler should report error on this. –  wyfeizj Jun 15 '12 at 16:42
    
@Oli Charlesworth: I think he's expecting the code to not compile since he redefined the -> operator. –  Tudor Jun 15 '12 at 16:42

2 Answers 2

Your code is:

A* a = new A;
a->Test();

The "a" is a pointer to an A. It is NOT an A object itself, it is a memory address of the A object on the heap.

When you call a->Test() you invoke the pointer's -> operator (built in for all pointer types in C++). You would have to do this to invoke your operator:

//Create an A (NOT a pointer).
A a;

//Invoke the A's operator ->
a->Test();

Which is how STL iterators work - they're class types, not pointers to class types. Note that the return type of operator -> must make sense for the operation/member you're trying to invoke.

So, here's an example that would call test via the ->:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    A* operator->()
    {
        return this;
    }
    void Test() { std::cout << "Hello World!"; }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    a->Test();
}

It's strange, but it works because a->Test(); returns the current object, which Test() is then called on (see the return this; line).

See STL iterators for useful examples of why you'd actually want to do this.

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You aren't calling your operator-> in your example, you are calling Test directly from an A*. You want:

(*a)->Test();

Or...

A a;
a->Test();

There's nothing wrong with VS2010 concerning operator-> (that I know of).

Using -> on a pointer named a effectively executes: (*a).. Using -> on a variable by value will invoke your operator-> if present, or be a syntax error if there is no operator->.

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Why "a->Test()" doesn't call "operator->", would you please kindly explain? –  wyfeizj Jun 15 '12 at 16:46
    
@wyfeizj I added a brief explanation –  Dave Jun 15 '12 at 16:55
    
I got it, thanks! –  wyfeizj Jun 15 '12 at 16:56
    
You can think of it that way: A* a; a->Test(); means that you're using the operator-> that is defined for a pointer-to-A! But you only overloaded your operator-> for A. A* and A are different types. –  s3rius Jun 15 '12 at 17:05

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