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I'm getting some inexplicable behavior from easymock and a JUnit test case. I'm receiving an IllegalStateException: missing behavior definition for the preceeding method call: myCollaborator.getCurrentApplyDate() Usage is: expect(a.foo()).andXXX(). I'm using easymock 3.1 to mock myCollaborator in a JUnit 4 test class that is testing classUnderTest.

classUnderTest needs to make two calls to myCollaborator. With just one call in place everything works fine. The @Before setup method in my JUnit test class:

@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception {
    mockCollaborator = EasyMock.createMock(MyCollaborator.class);
    classUnderTest = new myObject(mockCollaborator);
    data = new MyDTO();
    // other setup code for data omitted
    EasyMock.expect(mockCollaborator.getCurrentApplyDate()).andReturn(new java.sql.Date(123456789));
    // comment out this expectation for now so it works
    // EasyMock.expect(mockCollaborator.getCurrentBatch()).andReturn("123");
    EasyMock.replay();
}

The classUnderTest.process() method that I'm testing with the two calls to myCollaborator, the second one commented out so that it will work:

public MyDTO process(MyDTO data) throws Exception {
    // do some stuff to data
    java.sql.Date myDate = myCollaborator.getCurrentApplyDate();
    // do some stuff with myDate and data
    // comment out this call for now so it works
    // String currentBatch = myCollaborator.getCurrentBatch();
    // do some other stuff with currentBatch and data
    return data;
}

Once I uncomment the 2nd call (the one to myCollaborator.getCurrentBatch()) from the process() method and uncomment the expectation from the JUnit setUp() I start receiving the aforementioned IllegalStateException.

The code with those uncommented that doesn't work:

@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception {
    mockCollaborator = EasyMock.createMock(MyCollaborator.class);
    classUnderTest = new myObject(mockCollaborator);
    data = new MyDTO();
    // other setup code for data omitted
    EasyMock.expect(mockCollaborator.getCurrentApplyDate()).andReturn(new java.sql.Date(123456789));
    EasyMock.expect(mockCollaborator.getCurrentBatch()).andReturn("123");
    EasyMock.replay();
}

public MyDTO process(MyDTO data) throws Exception {
    // do some stuff to data
    java.sql.Date myDate = myCollaborator.getCurrentApplyDate();
    // do some stuff with myDate and data
    String currentBatch = myCollaborator.getCurrentBatch();
    // do some other stuff with currentBatch and data
    return data;
}

The return types of java.sql.Date and String are correct for these two methods. These methods are just getters like they sound; all they do is return instance variable values; no other processing or method calls occur in these getter methods.

The JUnit test method:

@Test
public void testSomeFunctionality(){
    // alter data to setup this test case
    try {
        data = classUnderTest.process(data);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // this is line 531, where the IllegalStateException is being caught
        fail("error msg " + e);
    }
    assertTrue(data.getSomeValue() == expectedValue)
}

The full stack trace:

java.lang.AssertionError: An unexpected exception has occurred:
java.lang.IllegalStateException: missing behavior definition for the preceding method call:
MyCollaborator.getCurrentApplyDate()
Usage is: expect(a.foo()).andXXX()
at org.junit.Assert.fail(Assert.java:91)
at qualified.package.name.ClassUnderTestTests.testSomeFunctionality(ClassUnderTestTests.java:531)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
at org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod$1.runReflectiveCall(FrameworkMethod.java:44)
at org.junit.internal.runners.model.ReflectiveCallable.run(ReflectiveCallable.java:15)
at org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod.invokeExplosively(FrameworkMethod.java:41)
at org.junit.internal.runners.statements.InvokeMethod.evaluate(InvokeMethod.java:20)
at org.junit.internal.runners.statements.RunBefores.evaluate(RunBefores.java:28)
at org.junit.internal.runners.statements.RunAfters.evaluate(RunAfters.java:31)
at org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.runChild(BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.java:76)
at org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.runChild(BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.java:50)
at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$3.run(ParentRunner.java:193)
at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$1.schedule(ParentRunner.java:52)
at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.runChildren(ParentRunner.java:191)
at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.access$000(ParentRunner.java:42)
at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner$2.evaluate(ParentRunner.java:184)
at org.junit.runners.ParentRunner.run(ParentRunner.java:236)
at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit4.runner.JUnit4TestReference.run(JUnit4TestReference.java:49)
at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.TestExecution.run(TestExecution.java:38)
at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.runTests(RemoteTestRunner.java:467)
at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.runTests(RemoteTestRunner.java:683)
at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.run(RemoteTestRunner.java:390)
at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.main(RemoteTestRunner.java:197)

I've used easymock and JUnit extensively in the past in exactly this manner and have never run into anything like this before. My colleagues are likewise stymied, so bonus kode monkey karma to anyone who can shed some light on whatever is going on here.

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1  
Your question is unclear - you've shown a setup method which calls getCurrentApplyDate, but you've also then posted code (outside a method) which calls getCurrentApplyDate and getCurrentBatch - which is it? Can you post a short but complete test class which demonstrates the problem? –  Jon Skeet Jun 15 '12 at 16:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your @Before example you show:

EasyMock.replay();

Shouldn't this be:

EasyMock.replay(mockCollaborator);
share|improve this answer
    
Omg you're right... wth does it work with the 2nd call commented out??? Suffering from JUnit overdose I think... We're all laughing at ourselves around here... Thanks much! –  SpreckFoo Jun 15 '12 at 17:20
1  
It works with the 2nd call commented out because the mock is "recording". So on the 1st call EasyMock is thinking you are going to call the EasyMock API again to state how the previous call is going to behave. When you call another method on the mock, EasyMock says "hey, you didn't tell me how that last method call was supposed to behave". –  Drew MacInnis Jun 15 '12 at 18:19

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