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I was doing a little experiment with virtual destructors to review - wondering if anyone has a simple explanation for the following (using vs 2010):

I Define class hierarchy A-B-C-D, D inherits C, C inherits B, B inherits A, A is the Base;

ran 2 experiments:

First experiment -

A has a virtual Destructor.

B has a non-Virtual Destructor

C has a virtual Destructor

D has a non virtual Destructor

//----------------------------

Allocate 4 objects on the heap of type D - Point a pointer of A*, B* and C* at the first 3 - Leave the 4th as a D* for Completeness. Delete all 4 Pointers.

As I expected, in all 4 instances, the complete destructor chain is executed in reverse order from D down to A, freeing all memory.

Second Experiment -

A has a non-virtual Destructor ** Changed A to non virtual

B has a non-Virtual Destructor

C has a virtual Destructor

D has a non virtual Distructor

Allocate 4 objects on the heap of type D - Point a pointer of A*, B*, and C* at the first 3 - Leave the 4th as a D* for Completeness.

Deleting C* and D* pointers: the complete destructor chain is executed in reverse order from D down to A, freeing all memory.

Deleting B*: B and then A Destructor is run (leak)

Deleting A*: Only A Destructor is run (leak)

Can anyone explain Why this is?

When D type opjects are allocated in experiment 2, its immediate base class (C) has a virtual destructor - doesnt that tell the compiler to track it with a Vptr and know the memory type? REGARDLESS of the reference?

Thanks Mike

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It would be lovely if you supplied your example code. –  Rook Jun 15 '12 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When D type opjects are allocated in experiment 2, its immediate base class (C) has a virtual destructor - doesnt that tell the compiler to track it with a Vptr and know the memory type? REGARDLESS of the reference?

No.

In your second test case, A and B don't have vptrs/vtables. (And even if they did, a non-virtual member function would still be resolved statically, not dynamically.)

Put another way, a base class does not "inherit" information (such as whether functions are virtual) from derived classes.

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If a base class does not inherit information from derived classes, why in experiment 1, does pointing a B reference to a D object (B has a non virtual destructor) still "know" its a D object allocation and run the entire destructor sequence for D type object? –  MikeyG Jun 15 '12 at 17:31
2  
Because in the first test-case, B's destructor is virtual; if a member function is virtual in the base class, then it's virtual in the derived class, even if you don't explicit declare it so. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 15 '12 at 17:33
    
OK, this makes sense - that's where my misunderstanding was - –  MikeyG Jun 15 '12 at 17:40

When you delete an A* without a virtual destructor, at compile-time the compiler does not know that it will point at runtime to an object with a virtual destructor. The deletion might be of an object with a virtual destructor -- or not. Dynamic binding does not occur.

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OK - So are you saying, the reference (Because it a type A pointer) does not know that at compile time, it will point at an object with a virtual destructor? –  MikeyG Jun 15 '12 at 17:23
    
(Incomplete comment above sorry) - yet, in experiment one, at compile, the B object has a virtual destructor in its base class - so when B points to D, the dynamic binding will occur? From this can I conclude the following? 1 - it is the reference (the pointer type) that will determine dynamic binding - not the actual allocated memory, and 2 - as long as somewhere in the inheritence chain there is a virtual destructor at compile time, dynamic binding will occur? –  MikeyG Jun 15 '12 at 17:28
    
Disregard - I got it now thanks –  MikeyG Jun 15 '12 at 17:41
    
Happy to help. 1 - yes; 2 - somewhere above the reference type, inclusive, yes. –  Andy Thomas Jun 15 '12 at 19:26

Is your actual question about why one would use virtual vs non-virtual destructors? Cos having a base class with a non-virtual destructor is bad. See the faq

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No, that's not the question. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 15 '12 at 17:03
    
It reads a lot like a demonstration of the problems that non-virtual destructors bring. All the behaviour he describes seems entirely expected. –  Rook Jun 15 '12 at 17:07
    
No - but I was missing the note in the faq - –  MikeyG Jun 15 '12 at 17:41

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