Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

We are running into a situation on an MVC3 project with both the Microsoft JSON serializers and JSON.NET.

Everybody knows DateTime's are basically broken in Microsoft's serializers, so we switched to JSON.NET to avoid this issue. That works great, except that some of the classes we are trying to serialize are POCOs with DataContract/DataMember attributes. They are defined in an assembly that is referenced in multiple places. Additionally, they have some other display properties that are not marked as DataMembers for efficiency. For instance, a Customer

[DataContract]
public class Customer
{
   [DataMember]
   public string FirstName { get; set;}
   [DataMember]
   public string LastName { get; set;}
   public string FullName 
   {
       get
       {  return FirstName + " " + LastName; }
   }

}

When this customer is passed over WCF the client side can reference that assembly and use the FullName just fine, but when serialized with JSON.NET it sees that FullName isn't a [DataMember] and doesn't serialize it. Is there an option to pass to JSON.NET to tell it to ignore the fact that a class has [DataContract] attribute applied?

Note: Using the JavaScriptSerializer in .NET works fine for the FullName property, but DateTimes are broken. I need JSON.NET to ignore the fact that this class has DataContract/DataMember attributes and just do standard public field serialization like it would if they weren't there.

share|improve this question
1  
Did you resolve this? I am having the exact same problem and need to find a resolution – Kendall Bennett Jul 10 '12 at 0:03
1  
I ended up adding the JsonProperty attribute for Json.Net – Nick Aug 9 '12 at 19:53

I was having a problem almost related to what you're having, and managed to find a solution by going through Json.NET's codes. So it may not be the best solution, but it works for me.

To do this, you need to implement your own IContractResolver. An over-simplified implementation of that to include all parameters and ignores all attributes (not just DataContract but other built-in Json.NET's rules as well, so whatever options you set that should originally affect the members selection is now being overidden by this code):

class AllPropertiesResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override List<MemberInfo> GetSerializableMembers(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType.GetProperties()
            .Where(p => p.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0)
            .Cast<MemberInfo>()
            .ToList();
    }
}

And here comes the code usage example:

var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(result, new JsonSerializerSettings {
    ContractResolver = new AllPropertiesResolver()
});
share|improve this answer

Simply use Json.Net's OptOut attribute. It will take precedence over DataContract.

[DataContract]
[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptOut)]
share|improve this answer

As Amry said you can uses your own IContractResolver.

Unfortunately the solution provided by Amry didn't work for me, below is the solution that I managed to get working:

public class AllPropertiesResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override JsonProperty CreateProperty(MemberInfo member, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        JsonProperty property = base.CreateProperty(member, memberSerialization);

        //property.HasMemberAttribute = true;
        property.Ignored = false;

        //property.ShouldSerialize = instance =>
        //{
        //    return true;
        //};

        return property;
    }
}

There are a few lines commented, these wern't required to make my solution work, but you never know!

This has the same usage as Amry's solution:

var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(result, new JsonSerializerSettings {
    ContractResolver = new AllPropertiesResolver()
});

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

In accordance to the Json.NET documentation [DataMember] attributes are ignored if the properties are also annotated with Json.NET specific attributes (such as [JsonProperty]).See the Serialization Attributes documentation for details:

Json.NET attributes take presidence over standard .NET serialization attributes, e.g. if both JsonPropertyAttribute and DataMemberAttribute are present on a property and both customize the name, the name from JsonPropertyAttribute will be used.

The documentation only covers the name property, but for my experience the [JsonProperty] attribute also fully shadows settings done by the [DataMember] attribute. So, if it is feasible for your case, also add Json.NET attributes to the properties for which the [DataMember] annotation should be ignored.

share|improve this answer

Have you tried this?

IgnoreDataAttribute

share|improve this answer
1  
I want to do the opposite of ignoring the field, I want the field to be included when serializing using JSON.NET – Nick Jun 15 '12 at 18:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.