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How can I map a DataReader object into a class object by using generics?

For example I need to do the following:

public class Mapper<T>
    {
        public static List<T> MapObject(IDataReader dr)
        {
            List<T> objects = new List<T>();

            while (dr.Read())
            {
                //Mapping goes here...
            }

            return objects;
        }
    }

And later I need to call this class-method like the following:

IDataReder dataReader = DBUtil.Fetchdata("SELECT * FROM Book");

List<Book> bookList = Mapper<Book>.MapObject(dataReder);

foreach (Book b in bookList)
{
     Console.WriteLine(b.ID + ", " + b.BookName);
}

Note that, the Mapper - class should be able to map object of any type represented by T.

share|improve this question
    
One suggestion - read into an IEnumerable<T> with a yield return. –  Daniel A. White Jul 9 '09 at 18:02
    
//mapping goes here, exactly what I've showed you in my answer, you can map any object to the data reader (more exactly: injecting values from an IDataReader into an object ANY TYPE) –  Omu Jun 15 '10 at 11:40
    
Why wouldn't you use a dedicated ORM then? A micro-ORM like Dapper seem to be a good fit here. –  nawfal Jul 29 at 20:27
    
@nawfal, This was asked in July, 2009. –  anonymous Jul 29 at 20:28
    
@BROY Honestly, with comments, answers etc always future visitors are considered too. And it's not like ORMs didnt exist in 2009 :) –  nawfal Jul 29 at 20:35

10 Answers 10

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I use ValueInjecter for this

I'm doing like this:

 while (dr.Read())
  {
      var o = new User();
      o.InjectFrom<DataReaderInjection>(dr);
      yield return o;
  }

you gonna need this ValueInjection for this to work:

public class DataReaderInjection : KnownSourceValueInjection<IDataReader>
    {
        protected override void Inject(IDataReader source, object target, PropertyDescriptorCollection targetProps)
        {
            for (var i = 0; i < source.FieldCount; i++)
            {
                var activeTarget = targetProps.GetByName(source.GetName(i), true);
                if (activeTarget == null) continue;

                var value = source.GetValue(i);
                if (value == DBNull.Value) continue;

                activeTarget.SetValue(target, value);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Is somewhere any library of common and useful injections? –  Pavel Hodek Dec 14 '12 at 14:44
    
@PavelHodek there isn't a library but there are many in valueinjecter's main demo solution and also in the codeplex pages –  Omu Dec 14 '12 at 15:38
    
Few things. 1) You're using reflection to set value, this is bad for performance. Go expression route. 2) Where is DataReaderInjection and KnownSourceValueInjection in your library? I think you changed names since this answer? 3) Is it using reflection behind the scenes every time in the while reader.Read loop to get property names? I hope no, but cant convince myself without seeing KnownSourceValueInjection class. –  nawfal Jul 29 at 14:55
    
4) This is minor but still - you're not assigning to property when it is null in database (DBNull case), but what if some value is assigned to that property when new-ing in the constructor, like "var o = new User()"? In that case the user you return will be different from what is actually present in the db. –  nawfal Jul 29 at 15:10

Well, i don't know if it fits here, but you could be using the yield keyword

public static IEnumerable<T> MapObject(IDataReader dr, Func<IDataReader, T> convertFunction)
        {
            while (dr.Read())
            {
                yield return convertFunction(dr);
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Interesting use of DI. It would be nice to have the T type provide the implementation of convertFunction as well. :D –  Adrian Godong Jul 9 '09 at 18:08
    
This is nice DI and it can be combined with Omu's solution. –  Pavel Hodek Dec 14 '12 at 14:39

You could use this LateBinder class I wrote: http://codecube.net/2008/12/new-latebinder/.

I wrote another post with usage: http://codecube.net/2008/12/using-the-latebinder/

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This is going to be very hard to do for the reason that you are basically trying to map two unknowns together. In your generic object the type is unknown, and in your datareader the table is unknown.

So what I would suggest is you create some kind of column attribute to attach to the properties of you entity. And then look through those property attributes and try to look up the data from those attributes in the datareader.

Your biggest problem is going to be, what happens if one of the properties isn't found in the reader, or vice-versa, one of the columns in the reader isn't found in the entity.

Good luck, but if you want to do something like this, you probably want a ORM or at the very least some kind of Active Record implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
look at my answer, it's not that hard :), and there's no attributes required –  Omu Aug 18 '10 at 6:17

The easiest way I can think of offhand would be to supply a Func<T,T> delegate for converting each column and constructing your book.

Alternatively, if you followed some conventions, you could potentially handle this via reflection. For example, if each column mapped to a property in the resulting object using the same name, and you restricted T in your Mapper to providing a constructable T, you could use reflection to set the value of each property to the value in the corresponding column.

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I don't think you'll be able to get around defining the relationship between fields in some form. Take a look at this article and pay particular attention to how the mapping is defined, it may work for you.

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/rmcochran/elegant_dal05212006130957PM/elegant_dal.aspx

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what about following

abstract class DataMapper
{
    abstract public object Map(IDataReader);
}

class BookMapper : DataMapper
{
   override public object Map(IDataReader reader)
   {
       ///some mapping stuff
       return book;
   }
}

public class Mapper<T>
{
    public static List<T> MapObject(IDataReader dr)
    {
        List<T> objects = new List<T>();
        DataMapper myMapper = getMapperFor(T);
        while (dr.Read())
        {
            objects.Add((T)myMapper(dr));
        }

        return objects;
    }

    private DataMapper getMapperFor(T myType)
    {
       //switch case or if or whatever
       ...
       if(T is Book) return bookMapper;

    }
}

Don't know if it is syntactically correct, but I hope u get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
You could avoid the if else conditions and rely on polymorphism provided the Book class itself implements some Func<IDataRecord, Book>. –  nawfal Jul 29 at 15:01

What about using Fluent Ado.net ?

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Have a look at http://CapriSoft.CodePlex.com

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I would recommend that you'd use AutoMapper for this.

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