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How can this test fail?

    [TestMethod]
    public void Get_Code()
    {
        var expected = new List<int>();
        expected.Add(100);
        expected.Add(400);
        expected.Add(200);
        expected.Add(900);
        expected.Add(2300);
        expected.Add(1900);

        var actual = new List<int>();
        actual.Add(100);
        actual.Add(400);
        actual.Add(200);
        actual.Add(900);
        actual.Add(2300);
        actual.Add(1900);

        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual); //AreSame(expected, actual) and IsTrue(expected.Equals(actual))  fails too
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 50 down vote accepted

EDIT: To make assertions about collections, you should use CollectionAssert:

CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected, actual);

List<T> doesn't override Equals, so if Assert.AreEqual just calls Equals, it will end up using reference equality.

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I never stop learning from you Jon. Earlier today I was trying to figure out how to get two objects to leverage their IEquatable<T> implementations with Assert.AreEqual. Of course, as you stated, it calls the base Equals(object) override. Thanks there. And now, of course there's another class for collection assertions. Jon, you've been a great blessing to myself and community, I just hope I get to meet you one day! –  Michael Perrenoud Nov 16 '13 at 20:18
    
Skeet always knows! –  Michael Harper Oct 20 at 19:40

this test compares a date input, checks if its a leap year, if so, outputs 20 leap years from the inputted date, if not, outputs the NEXT 20 leap years, myTest.Testing refers to the myTest instance which in turn calls the values from a List called Testing containing the calculated values required. part of an exercise I had to do.

[TestMethod]
        public void TestMethod1()
        {
            int testVal = 2012;
            TestClass myTest = new TestClass();
            var expected = new List<int>();
            expected.Add(2012);
            expected.Add(2016);
            expected.Add(2020);
            expected.Add(2024);
            expected.Add(2028);
            expected.Add(2032);
            expected.Add(2036);
            expected.Add(2040);
            expected.Add(2044);
            expected.Add(2048);
            expected.Add(2052);
            expected.Add(2056);
            expected.Add(2060);
            expected.Add(2064);
            expected.Add(2068);
            expected.Add(2072);
            expected.Add(2076);
            expected.Add(2080);
            expected.Add(2084);
            expected.Add(2088);
            var actual = myTest.Testing(2012);
            CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
        }
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I guess this will help

Assert.IsTrue(expected.SequenceEqual(actual));
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1  
That was my fall-back too, but I'd hope that CollectionAssert would provide more helpful failure messages. –  Jon Skeet Jun 15 '12 at 17:48

I tried the other answers in this thread, and they didn't work for me and I was comparing collections of objects that had the same values stored in their properties, but the objects were different.

Method Call :

CompareIEnumerable(to, emailDeserialized.ToIndividual,
            (x, y) => x.ToName == y.ToName && x.ToEmailAddress == y.ToEmailAddress);

Method for comparisons:

private static void CompareIEnumerable<T>(IEnumerable<T> one, IEnumerable<T> two, Func<T, T, bool> comparisonFunction)
    {
        var oneArray = one as T[] ?? one.ToArray();
        var twoArray = two as T[] ?? two.ToArray();

        if (oneArray.Length != twoArray.Length)
        {
            Assert.Fail("Collections are not same length");
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < oneArray.Length; i++)
        {
            var isEqual = comparisonFunction(oneArray[i], twoArray[i]);
            Assert.IsTrue(isEqual);
        }
    }
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Nice addition, or you can also override the Equals method and the CollectionAssert will work. –  Ray Cheng Jul 15 at 15:59

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