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I've the following code.if i give control_word as 6 why if condition evaluates to true and enters inside if block?what exactly is happening here?

#define MACRO1 0x01
#define MACRO2 0x02
#define MACRO4 0x04
#define MACRO3 MACRO1 | MACRO2
#define MACRO7 MACRO4 | MACRO3

int main()
{
    if(control_word == MACRO3 || control_word == MACRO7)
    {
        /*DO SOME OPERATION*/
    }
    else
    {
        /*DO SOMETHING ELSE */
    }

}
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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Praetorian, H2CO3, Niko, shiplu.mokadd.im Jun 15 '12 at 17:54

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3  
This is not a question about macros. You can just perform all the substitutions, and you'll see why you get that result. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 15 '12 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The expression

control_word == MACRO3 || control_word == MACRO7

expands to

control_word == MACRO1 | MACRO2 || control_word == MACRO4 | MACRO3

which eventually expands to

control_word == 1 | 2 || control_word == 4 | 1 | 2

looking at the precedence table, you see that operator == has higher precendence than |, which is higher than ||, so the evaluation is:

((control_word == 1) | 2) || ((control_word == 4) | 1 | 2)

which evaluates to

((6 == 1) | 2) || ((6 == 4) | 1 | 2)

which is (6==1 is false, which is treated as 0 in the arithmetic expression -- same for 6==4)

((0 | 2) || (0 | 1 | 2)

which is

2 || 3

which is

true

as 2 and 3 are treated as true (non-zero), so you enter the if block, not the else

To preserve the (presumed) intent (and get the result you exprected) you need to protect the expansion of the macros by wrapping their definition in parentheses -- note that this is always a good idea to avoid the dissonance between what you think and what is actually happening.

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The precedence of the | and == operators is not that you think it is. Moral: always parenthesize your macros!

#define MACRO3 (MACRO1 | MACRO2)
#define MACRO7 (MACRO4 | MACRO3)

So what happens is the expression expands to

control_word == 0x01 | 0x02 || control_word == 0x01 | 0x02  | 0x04

which in turn forms

(control_word == 1) | 2 || (control_word == 7) | 6)

that is

0 | 2 || 0 | 6

so all in all it's

2 || 6

which is interpreted by C as "true or true", and that yields true.

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Yes i agree parenthesis solves the problem.can you please explain how it entered if block?What is the exact behavior here? –  Sandeep Jun 15 '12 at 17:48
2  
It's not a precedence issue between | and ||, it's == and |. See this precedence chart and consider what happens when changing the code to: if((control_word == MACRO3) || (control_word == MACRO7)) –  pb2q Jun 15 '12 at 17:49
    
Corrected, see update. –  user529758 Jun 15 '12 at 17:49

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