Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it just the built-in tools? Fundamentally, the format is no-hinderance to marshalling an xml automatically.

The only diff between a xml and json is the [tag]HI World[/tag] to {tag:HI World}, respectively ..so the JSON obj is half the size

right?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

It's not necessarily easier. A complete JSON parser implementation can be just as complex as one for XML documents. Granted, the size of a JSON string is almost always smaller than it's XML equivalent due to obvious reasons.

However, choosing between JSON in XML as a data transport format depends on the underlying technology (JavaScript to JavaScript or to server, or the other way around). In other cases, for example when your data already exists as XML, it is not very efficient to convert it to JSON just so you can send it somewhere (to a REST service, or whatever).

So, it's a simple choice: choose what's best supported by the technology you're using. JSON for processing to/from JavaScript and XML for SOAP web services or when your data is already in XML.

share|improve this answer
add comment

JSON has its roots in Javascript, which is a dynamic language with loose typing. Every data item is "loosely typed", which means the runtime system doesn't much care whether the thing is a string of characters, or an array, or an integer, or an object or a function. Variables hold "something", and the type is determined when you try to do something with them.

Therefore de-serializing a JSON packet is pretty simple. The representation to be deserialized is either a string or a number.

With XML on the other hand, the XML Schema standard set out a number of specific data types, including basic things like integers, floats, strings, but also dateTime, date, and then more complex derived types, like ordered sequences of those things, arrays of those things, and "unions". When this XML stuff was being defined, there was a great deal of effort around guaranteeing that xml documents were a.) well formed, and b.) valid according to one of these fairly specific schema definitions. Most xml serializers use some portion of the typing magic.

In XML schema you can also specify references, so that one item in an XML document can refer to another item.

As an illustration, right now when I use the stackexchange API to query a list of "question answers" a particular user has posted, I get back a list of items, each of which contains a repeated block for the same user. They all look like this (pseudo code):

{ answers: [ 
  { answer_id: 98393398398
    question_id 28282828
    owner: {
     name: Cheeso
     user_id 48082
     reputation: 3093
     date_created: 110101010}
   },
  { answer_id: 28783398398
    question_id 111128828
    owner: {
     name: Cheeso
     user_id 48082
     reputation: 3093
     date_created: 110101010}
   },
   ...
] } 

But XML allows me to refer to other places in the document, so I'd get back something like this (again, pseudo code):

{ users: [ ["#user1", "Cheeso", "48082", 3093 ]] ,
  answers: [ 
   { answer_id: 98393398398
    question_id 28282828
    owner: #user1 },
  { answer_id: 28783398398
    question_id 111128828
    owner: #user1},
   ...
] } 

Of course you could structure your json applications to understand and use "in-document references". But the point is, with XML, that is already part of the model.

All of which means serializing and de-serializing XML can be more involved, in practice, than doing the same with JSON.

It's my opinion that people are finding the looser json approach to be preferable because it is more flexible and adaptable, and easier to use. On the other hand some documents are large enough that the rigidity and formality of XML schema is super valuable, and json is just too loose. I'm thinking of an OOXML document, for example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

JSON provides a serialization of data structures used in Javascript, which are very similar to data structures found in many programming languages. XML was designed for markup of documents. So JSON was designed to match what programming languages are good at, XML was designed to meet the needs of document authoring.

people are finding the looser json approach to be preferable because it is more flexible

On the contrary. People are finding JSON preferable because it is less flexible; it only does the things that are easy to handle in languages like Javascript.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.