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I have this statement in my c program and I want to optimize. By optimization I particularly want to refer to bitwise operators (but any other suggestion is also fine).

uint64_t h_one = hash[0];
uint64_t h_two = hash[1];
for ( int i=0; i<k; ++i )
{
    (uint64_t *) k_hash[i] = ( h_one + i * h_two ) % size;   //suggest some optimization for this line.
} 

Any suggestion will be of great help.

Edit: As of now size can be any int but it is not a problem and we can round it up to the next prime (but may be not a power of two as for larger values the power of 2 increases rapidly and it will lead to much wastage of memory)

h_two is a 64 bit int(basically a chuck of 64 bytes).

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Do you know anything about size? –  Mysticial Jun 15 '12 at 19:33
    
I have edited the question to make a few things clear as you demanded –  Aman Deep Gautam Jun 15 '12 at 19:38
1  
There are methods out there that make repeated divisions/modulus over the same number very efficient. But it's not trivial. –  Mysticial Jun 15 '12 at 19:40
    
can you suggest some links for me to read up a bit. –  Aman Deep Gautam Jun 15 '12 at 19:41
1  
Here it is: gmplib.org/~tege/divcnst-pldi94.pdf But like I said, non-trivial. –  Mysticial Jun 15 '12 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

so essentially you're doing

k_0 = h_1 mod s
k_1 = h_1 + h_2 mod s = k_0 + h_2 mod s
k_2 = h_1 + h_2 + h_2 mod s = k_1 + h_2 mod s
..
k_n = k_(n-1) + h_2 mod s

Depending on overflow issues (which shouldn't differ from the original if size is less than half of 2**64), this could be faster (less easy to parallelize though):

uint64_t h_one = hash[0];
uint64_t h_two = hash[1];
k_hash[0] = h_one % size;
for ( int i=1; i<k; ++i )
{
    (uint64_t *) k_hash[i] = ( k_hash[i-1] + h_two ) % size;
} 

Note there is a possibility that your compiler already came to this form, depending on which optimization flags you use.

Of course this only eliminated one multiplication. If you want to eliminate or reduce the modulo, I guess that based on h_two%size and h_1%size you can predetermine the steps where you have to explicitly call %size, something like this:

uint64_t h_one = hash[0]%size;
uint64_t h_two = hash[1]%size;
k_hash[0] = h_one;
step = (size-(h_one))/(h_two)-1;
for ( int i=1; i<k; ++i )
{
    (uint64_t *) k_hash[i] = ( k_hash[i-1] + h_two );
    if(i==step)
    {
        k_hash[i] %= size;
    }
} 

Note I'm not sure of the formula (didn't test it), it's more a general idea. This would greatly depend on how good your branch prediction is (and how big a performance-hit a misprediction is). ALso it's only likely to help if step is big.

edit: or more simple (and probably with the same performance) -thanks to Mystical:

uint64_t h_one = hash[0]%size;
uint64_t h_two = hash[1]%size;
k_hash[0] = h_one;
for ( int i=1; i<k; ++i )
{
    (uint64_t *) k_hash[i] = ( k_hash[i-1] + h_two );
    if(k_hash[i] > size)
    {
        k_hash[i] -= size;
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 It's actually possible to completely remove the modulus in your first approach if you can prove that k_hash[i-1] + h_two will never overflow the integer. But seeing as how it's a hash, I'm going to assume that the numbers are pretty much random. –  Mysticial Jun 15 '12 at 20:34
    
@Mysticial size was an int though, and the rest are uint_64's, so they shouldn't overflow (h_two can of course be pre-reduced) –  harold Jun 15 '12 at 20:37
2  
@harold, the it looks like we have a solution. Precompute h_two % size and start with h_one % size. Then at each iteration, add it to an accumulator. Then use an if-statement to test if it's greater than size and subtract if necessary. –  Mysticial Jun 15 '12 at 20:40
    
@Mysticial: actually my second solution is more or less that, except that I predetermine the step where the modulo should happen. A simple > would probably be more readable and just as efficient though, I'll add it. –  KillianDS Jun 15 '12 at 20:58
    
@all thank you! –  Aman Deep Gautam Jun 15 '12 at 21:33

If size is a power of two, then applying a bitwise AND to size - 1 optimizes "% size":

(uint64_t *)k_hash[i] = (h_one + i * h_two) & (size - 1)
share|improve this answer
    
making size a power of 2 is too much to ask for but we can have it as a prime so can you suggest something in that case –  Aman Deep Gautam Jun 15 '12 at 19:40

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