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Java doesn't support multiple inheritance for abstract classes, but I'm trying to do the equivalent of this in C++:

//this is Java-style pseudocode
public abstract class Rectangle{
    public abstract double getHeight();
    public abstract double getWidth();
    public double getHeight(){
        return getWidth()*getHeight();
    }
}

public abstract class Container{
    public abstract void printTypes();
    public abstract void printEachElement();
    public void printContainerStuff(){
        System.out.print("Has the types: ");
        printTypes();
        System.out.print("List of elements: ");
        printEachElement();
    }
}

public abstract class Array extends Rectangle, Container{ //this can't be done in Java, but what about C++?

}

Is there an equivalent of Java abstract classes in C++ that would make it possible to do this?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C++ allows multiple inheritance. So that is allowed in C++.

And the equivalent of Java's abstract class in C++ is a class that has at least one pure virtual member function.

So the equivalent of the Java code in C++ would be this:

class Rectangle
{
  public:
    virtual double getHeight() = 0;
    virtual double getWidth() = 0;
    double getHeight(){
        return getWidth()*getHeight();
    }
};

class Container(){
  public:
    virtual void printTypes() = 0;
    virtual void printEachElement() =0;
};
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Sorry, I edited your answer before noticing that hmjd already provide the information missing from yours. I rollbacked, I don't know if that's the thing to do or not... –  Luc Touraille Jun 15 '12 at 20:25
    
Do pure virtual functions in C++ act like abstract methods in Java? –  Anderson Green Jun 15 '12 at 23:45
    
@AndersonGreen: Yes. –  Nawaz Jun 16 '12 at 2:21
    
Also, is it possible to create methods in a class that can be called without creating an instance of the class (like static methods in Java?) –  Anderson Green Jun 16 '12 at 2:23
    
@AndersonGreen: Yes. You can have static member functions also. Search for it. –  Nawaz Jun 16 '12 at 2:40
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To make a class abstract in C++ at least one member function must be pure virtual:

class X
{
public:
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

As has already been stated, multiple inheritance is permitted in C++:

class Rectangle
{
public:
    virtual double getHeight() = 0;
    virtual double getWidth() = 0;
    double getHeight(){
        return getWidth()*getHeight();
    }
};

class Container
{
public:
    virtual void printTypes() = 0;
    virtual void printEachElement() = 0;
};

class Array: public Rectangle, public Container
{
    // If the pure virtual member functions in the base classes
    // are not implemented then this class is also abstract.
};
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I think you're looking for Java interfaces.

public abstract class Rectangle{
    public abstract double getHeight();
    public abstract double getWidth();
    public double getHeight(){
        return getWidth()*getHeight();
    }
}

public interface Container {
    public void printTypes();
    public void printEachElement();
}

public abstract class Array extends Rectangle implements Container {
}

In C++ you can have multiple inheritance. You can also have something like Java interfaces with pure virtual methods.

class Container {
    public:
        virtual void printTypes() = 0;
        virtual void printEachElement() = 0;
}
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I'm actually looking for multiple inheritance of abstract classes - in Java this isn't possible, but in C++ I think it is possible. Interfaces can't implement their own methods, but abstract classes can. –  Anderson Green Jun 15 '12 at 22:57
    
@AndersonGreen - You're correct on all counts. In Java you can implement multiple interfaces, but you can only inherit from one class (Object, if you don't specify anything else). In C++, you can inherit from any number of classes, abstract or not. –  Ted Hopp Jun 17 '12 at 1:48
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If you want inheritance behavior. (The code is in Java, You can try some thing like this in c++)

abstract class Rectangle{

    public abstract double getHeight();
    public abstract double getWidth();
    public double getHeight(){
        return getWidth()*getHeight();
    }
}

abstract class Container extends Rectangle{
    public abstract void printTypes();
    public abstract void printEachElement();
}

abstract class Array extends Container{ 

}
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1  
Doesn't look like C++ code to me –  Mooing Duck Jun 15 '12 at 23:05
    
I don't want the Container class to extend Rectangle. I want other non-Rectangle classes (for example, a 3-dimensional arraylist) to extend it as well. –  Anderson Green Jun 15 '12 at 23:42
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