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I have a table of over 9 million rows. I have a SELECT query that I'm using an index for. Here is the query:

SELECT `username`,`id`
FROM `04c1Tg0M`
WHERE `id` > 9259466
AND `tried` = 0
LIMIT 1;

That query executes very fast (0.00 sec). Here is the explain for that query:

+----+-------------+----------+-------+-----------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table    | type  | possible_keys   | key     | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra       |
+----+-------------+----------+-------+-----------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | 04c1Tg0M | range | PRIMARY,triedex | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL | 10822 | Using where |
+----+-------------+----------+-------+-----------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------------+

Now here is the same query except that I'm going to change the id to 6259466:

SELECT `username`,`id`
FROM `04c1Tg0M`
WHERE `id` > 5986551
AND `tried` = 0
LIMIT 1;

That query took 4.78 seconds to complete. This is the problem. Here is the explain for that query:

+----+-------------+----------+------+-----------------+---------+---------+-------+---------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table    | type | possible_keys   | key     | key_len | ref   | rows    | Extra       |
+----+-------------+----------+------+-----------------+---------+---------+-------+---------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | 04c1Tg0M | ref  | PRIMARY,triedex | triedex | 2       | const | 9275107 | Using where |
+----+-------------+----------+------+-----------------+---------+---------+-------+---------+-------------+

What is happening here and how can I fix it? Here are my indexes:

+----------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| Table    | Non_unique | Key_name | Seq_in_index | Column_name | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type | Comment |
+----------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| 04c1Tg0M |          0 | PRIMARY  |            1 | id          | A         |     9275093 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| 04c1Tg0M |          1 | pdex     |            1 | username    | A         |     9275093 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| 04c1Tg0M |          1 | pdex     |            2 | id          | A         |     9275093 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| 04c1Tg0M |          1 | pdex     |            3 | tried       | A         |     9275093 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| 04c1Tg0M |          1 | triedex  |            1 | tried       | A         |           0 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| 04c1Tg0M |          1 | triedex  |            2 | id          | A         |     9275093 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
+----------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+

And here is my table structure:

| 04c1Tg0M | CREATE TABLE `04c1Tg0M` (
`id` int(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`username` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
`tried` tinyint(1) DEFAULT '0',
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `pdex` (`username`,`id`,`tried`),
KEY `triedex` (`tried`,`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=9275108 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 |
share|improve this question
    
Did you run those queries one immediately after the other? – Dancrumb Jun 15 '12 at 20:24
    
within a few seconds of each other – xendi Jun 15 '12 at 20:26
2  
Have you realized that you are examining 3M rows more (supousing the ids are correlative) than in the first query? You only get one row in the result but you are examining a lot of rows more. – Ander2 Jun 15 '12 at 20:26
    
@Ander2 that is likely a result of it not using the index. NO index = must check more records before it finds the right one. It is called a full-table scan. – Stefan H Jun 15 '12 at 20:30
1  
There are no more than 9275108 records in the table, so id > 9259466 doesn't have to check many index values. When changed to id > 5986551, it would have to look at many more values (possibly most). Because of this, I suppose the optimizer believes that using the index on tried will be more limiting than using the index on id, so it uses that instead. – Wiseguy Jun 15 '12 at 20:59
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first SQL returns 10822 rows, while the second one returns 9275107 rows!

The use of primary key "id" index in the second query isn't so useful because you have to do a full table scan anyway.

MySQL's cost-based optimizer thinks, in the case of the 2nd query, it's better off to use the index on 'tried'.

If you have to do a full table-scan, you're better off not using an index, as index constitutes additional disk reads.

You can use "use index" or "force index" in your query to hint to the optimizer whether to use an index.

Also update the statistics by analyzing your table periodically so the cost-based optimizer is working correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
forcing an index or index hinting will definitely do the work – Uday Sawant Jun 19 '12 at 14:10

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