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I have created an utility function which I include in almost all Javascript code I write. The purpose of the said function is to simply remove one element from an array. It takes an array and an index as the arguments, and returns the array which has the required element removed.

Here's the function:

sliceHere = function(array, i)
{
    buffOne = array.slice(0, i);
    buffTwo = array.slice(i + 1);

    return buffOne.concat(buffTwo);         
}

It works quite alright. If I had an array a = ["a", "b", "c"], and I wanted to remove the "a" from it, I'd simply do a = sliceHere(a, 0);.

Although this did work, I wanted to replace it with something more "elegant". What I wanted to do is to make the function sliceHere a method of all the arrays I have. So I could simply do a.sliceHere(0) and achieve the same effect. It just feels like a better way of doing things, correct me if I'm wrong.

What I did was this:

sliceHere = function(i)
{
    buffOne = this.slice(0, i);
    buffTwo = this.slice(i + 1);

    this = buffOne.concat(buffTwo);         
}

Array.prototype.sliceHere = sliceHere

This didn't seem like it would work at all. Because I knew that "this" probably wasn't the actual array. How do I reference the array from inside of a method?

share|improve this question
    
1  
You could just do a.splice(0,1);? And you wouldn't have to even assign it to anything. –  Esailija Jun 15 '12 at 21:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why do you want to re-invent the wheel? Array.prototype.splice already does the same thing:

var array = [1, 2, 3];
var i = 1;
array.splice(i, 1);
array; // [2, 3]

Okay, let's re-invent the wheel:

With splice:

Array.prototype.sliceHere = function(i) {
    this.splice(i, 1);
};

Without splice:

Array.prototype.sliceHere = function(i) {
     var i_want_you = this.slice(0, i).concat(this.slice(i + 1));
     this.length = 0;
     this.push.apply(this, i_want_you);  // <-- Modifies all keys, indirectly
};

If you do not want the method to show up in for(.. in ..) loops, use Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, 'sliceHere', {value: /*function here*/});.

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Now I feel stupid for not answering this right away :D –  Esailija Jun 15 '12 at 21:04
2  
Sure, but it still might be nice for future readers of the OP's question to know what the actual answer is. –  Robert Harvey Jun 15 '12 at 21:04
    
Oh, that's nice, didn't know that... Thanks I guess, but I'm gonna accept Sergey's answer instead, he did answer my question after all. –  jco Jun 15 '12 at 21:06
    
@Bane it's your first code snippet copypasted, and that's the real answer? :'( –  Esailija Jun 15 '12 at 21:07
    
@Bane Updated my answer. It's a square wheel though. –  Rob W Jun 15 '12 at 21:11

this is always readonly so you cannot assign a new array to it, you should return an updated value instead. Here is an updated version of your example:

sliceHere = function(i)
{
    buffOne = this.slice(0, i);
    buffTwo = this.slice(i + 1);

    return buffOne.concat(buffTwo);
}

Array.prototype.sliceHere = sliceHere;

var arr = [1, 2, 3];
arr = arr.sliceHere(1);
share|improve this answer
    
So there is no way to somehow actually write into the object? And if so, how does splice work, then? –  jco Jun 15 '12 at 21:07
1  
splice modifies the existing instance in place, no replacement of the object happens. –  lanzz Jun 15 '12 at 21:08
    
Well can't I do that? –  jco Jun 15 '12 at 21:09
    
You can call object methods, change its properties values, but no, you cannot make it point to another object. –  Sergey Rybalkin Jun 15 '12 at 21:10
    
You could: while (i < tail.length) this[i] = this[++i]; this.length--; (note that I'm deliberately avoiding to use splice in this example, as it would make the whole exercise moot) –  lanzz Jun 15 '12 at 21:13

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