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Using git, I would like to be able to keep a certain folder as part of my local project (feature it in branches, etc) yet I don't want this directory getting pushed up to the public git server.

The folder in question has some CLI Java stuff that the project does not need, but I would like to keep in in sync with the branch work that will go live.

Is this possible?

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Reading the other answer, could you clarify if you just want one folder in your git repo which does not get tracked (no commits) or do you want a folder which you commit as usual but which is not pushed to the server? – Sgoettschkes Jun 15 '12 at 21:33
    
Can you go into more detail about how the stuff in the folder you want to exclude relates to the rest of the project? Maybe it is an option to keep the stuff in a separate branch you don't push to the remote repository? – Dan Jun 15 '12 at 21:44

A very short answer is no. Here is why: When your local git branch is pushed to a server, it's pushed as is without any exceptions. As a commit contains files, it would mess up git internally if some files would not be pushed. This kind of selective behaviour is not supported and I guess it'll never be, as most of the time you are using git incorrectly when you need such stuff.

There are, however, many ways:

  1. The first one is simply adding the stuff to the repo. You are obviously needing it and you want it to be version controlled, so from my point of view that's all that is needed to add files to git.
  2. You could try git-submodules, but this would also add files to your repo. Your java cli would be another repository and your original repo would track the versions.
  3. You could tell git to ignore the subfolder, than create your java-cli repository there and just the two without any interaction.

I would definitly go with 1 because when I need something for the project, then it belongs to the repo, even if it's java cli.

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An even shorter answer is YES!
Its now a feature in github. You can exclude file types using gitignore.
https://help.github.com/articles/ignoring-files/
I personally exclude the file directory called ASSETS from all my repos by adding the following to my global gitignore file:
ASSETS/*
Example:

# Compiled source #
###################
*.com
*.class
*.dll
*.exe
*.o
*.so

# Packages #
############
# it's better to unpack these files and commit the raw source
# git has its own built in compression methods
*.7z
*.dmg
*.gz
*.iso
*.jar
*.rar
*.tar
*.zip

# Logs and databases #
######################
*.log
*.sql
*.sqlite

# OS generated files #
######################
.DS_Store
.DS_Store?
._*
.Spotlight-V100
.Trashes
ehthumbs.db
Thumbs.db

# Audio Files #
###############
*.wav
*.mp3
*.wma

# Video Files #
###############
*.wmv
*.mpg
*.mpeg
*.mp4
*.mov
*.flv
*.avi
*.ogv
*.ogg
*.webm

# Image Files #
###############
*.jpg
*.gif
*.png
*.svg
*.ico

# Folders #
###########
ASSETS/*

# Documents #
#############
*.pdf
*.doc


The above file on my arch linux machine is located at ~/.gitignore_global

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – ZygD May 2 '15 at 22:07

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